REVIEW: ‘Infinite Frontier,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Infinite Frontier #1

Infinite Frontier #1 is written by Josh Williamson, illustrated by Xermanico,  colored by Romula Fajardo Jr, and lettered by Tom Napolitano. It is published by DC Comics. Following the events of Dark Nights: Death Metal, the Multiverse has been reborn-and with that rebirth comes a multitude of new threats. President Superman and the Justice League Incarnate become aware of the threat when the Flashpoint Batman crash-lands on Earth-23. Meanwhile, the Flash (Barry Allen) travels the Multiverse and discovers a dark secret while Roy Harper comes to terms with his new lease on life, and the first Green Lantern, Alan Scott, reconnects with his children Obsidian and Jade.

On paper, that sounds like a lot to handle, but thankfully Williamson is more than up to the task. Having tackled grand concepts during his run on The Flash, Williamson eagerly leaps headfirst into dealing with alternate Earths and secret societies. He also manages to handle the task of dealing with multiple characters by essentially splitting the issue into five different story threads, with all of the stories set to collide down the road. And while plot points from Infinite Frontier #0 are touched upon, readers can easily pick up this issue without picking up the one-shot. Personally, I would recommend reading both issues as #0 will enhance the reading experience of #1.

Infinite Frontier #1 also contains a wealth of fan-favorite characters within its pages. If you’re a fan of the Justice Society of America, there’s Alan Scott, who is working to reconnect with his kids and living in a new era where he can be openly gay. If you’re a fan of the work Grant Morrison did on The Multiversity, Justice Incarnate makes an appearance. And if you’re a fan of the original Crisis on Infinite Earths, you’ll want to pay close attention to the Flash’s storyline, as it hints at a similar cataclysmic event (and features the return of a threat from Infinite Frontier #0). Williamson effortlessly handles writing all of these characters, and Xermanico brings them to life with his artwork.

And what artwork it is. Xermanico delivers the bold images you’d expect for a DC Universe comic. From Scott summoning a massive green train engine to the Flash breaking through multiple Earths, there are plenty of amazing things to see in this issue. Xermanico is well known for illustrating the heroes of Justice League Dark; this comic serves as proof that he’s just as comfortable illustrating the depths of the Multiverse as he is the shadows of Earth-0. He also designs a new character titled “X-Tract,” whose cyberpunk-influenced design draws inspiration from Ghost in the Shell and Blade Runner.

Binging Xermanico’s artwork to life is Fajardo Jr. Fajardo Jr. makes each environment feel unique, giving them a specific color scheme. Green Lantern’s battle takes place in an unusually sunny Gotham City, with shades of blue and yellow bringing a summer’s sky to life. The Bleed in which Justice Incarnate travels is appropriately blood red. And befitting its name, Earth-Omega is a desolate wasteland shrouded in shadows.

Infinite Frontier #1 is a love letter to the nearly infinite possibilities of the DC Universe, boasting a wide cast of characters and hinting at new paths for familiar faces. Given where the first issue leaves its characters, this is only the beginning of the journey. But it’s a journey I am more than willing to see through to the end.

Infinite Frontier #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Infinite Frontier #1
5

TL;DR

Infinite Frontier #1 is a love letter to the nearly infinite possibilities of the DC Universe, boasting a wide cast of characters and hinting at new paths for familiar faces. Given where the first issue leaves its characters, this is only the beginning of the journey. But it’s a journey I am more than willing to see through to the end.