REVIEW: ‘BRZRKR,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Brzrkr #3 - But Why ThoBRZRKR #3 is written by Keanu Reeves and Matt Kindt, illustrated by Ron Garney, colored by Bill Crabtree, and lettered by Clem Robbins. It is published by BOOM! Studios. In a departure from the first two issues, this issue takes place almost entirely in the form of a flashback from B’s past. B’s contentious relationship with his parents is detailed, as well as his struggle with his ever-present bloodlust. In the present, the U.S. Government works to find a way to replicate B’s supernatural abilities.

This issue is probably my favorite of the series as it finally gives B more pathos and more character beyond “immortal killing machine who happens to look like Keanu Reeves.” Under Reeves and Kindt’s respective pens, the young B is in the throes of what can only be described as an existential crisis. He is called “unute” by his tribe, which apparently translates to “weapon” or “tool”—rather fitting, given his origins. His father dodges questions about his true parentage. And he grows to loathe the sight of violence, a trait that he will carry throughout the millennia. I rather enjoyed this look into what makes B tick, as it finally allows me to be invested in his journey.

The issue also pits B and his tribe against several of their warring neighbors, once again giving Garney and Crabtree full reign to cut loose. And cut loose they do: B is shown tearing limbs off of his opponents, literally stomping holes in them, and even disintegrating one opponent’s head with a single blow. Garney also finds an inventive way to display the action, showcasing his various panels as skewing sideways which draws the reader’s eyes all across the page and lets them drink in the details of his artwork. Perhaps the most disturbing image in the issue comes when B confronts his father after a raid: half of his face is ripped off, leaving a bloody mass of meat in lieu of where his skin and nose used to be.

Colorwise, Crabtree goes for a muted palette which adds to the often somber tone of the issue. The climactic battle is set on a snowy night, with a dark blue sky that’s flecked with particles of white. Crackling fires glow orange and red, throwing shadows on faces and hinting at hidden thoughts. Crabtree often breaks things (and bodies) up with splatters of red and black meant to represent flesh and blood. This continues to be a visually stunning book, with the setting and action highly reminiscent of Frank Miller’s 300.

If there’s one issue with the story, I’m not sure if this premise can sustain 12 issues. By now the series has covered B’s origin; this more than likely would probably be the halfway point of the film or TV series Netflix intends to launch. I’ve always believed that if your series is a certain length, it should have enough story for that length of issues-and as it stands, I feel like this is a six-issue, not a twelve-issue series. I’m willing to be proven wrong, though.

BRZRKR #3 digs deeper into its protagonist’s psyche with an issue that’s light on plot but heavy on action. Hopefully, the next issue will push the story forward and introduce a new challenge for B, or at the very least introduce friction between him and his handlers.

BRZRKR #3 is available wherever comics are sold.


BRZRKR #3
4

TL;DR

BRZRKR #3 digs deeper into its protagonist’s psyche with an issue that’s light on plot but heavy on action. Hopefully, the next issue will push the story forward and introduce a new challenge for B, or at the very least introduce friction between him and his handlers.