REVIEW: ‘Miles Morales: Spider-Man,’ Issue #27

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Miles Morales Spider-Man #27 - But Why Tho

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #27 is written by Saladin Ahmed, illustrated by Carmen Carnerocolored by David Curiel, and lettered by VC’s Cory Petit. It is published by Marvel Comics. Part three of “The Clone Saga” finds Miles at the mercy of his three clones, as he unwittingly destroyed the means with which they’ve prolonged their lives. Before departing to kill Miles’ family and friends, Selim reveals that he and his brothers were created by the Assessor-the terrifying being who previously captured and experimented on Miles!

With this issue, the creative team continues to pile up problems for Miles. Not only is he immobilized and helpless, but people wearing his face are targeting his loved ones, which is a nightmare in and of itself. Yet Ahmed also gives Miles’s clones a measure of pathos: in the same way that Miles was experimented on and viewed as nothing more than a science experiment by the Assessor, the clones were more or less robbed of their childhood and trained to be weapons. Most attempts to foster empathy for a villain in fiction often come out of left field or they’re for villains who quite frankly don’t deserve it. Ahmed thankfully threads that needle with a grace that one can’t help but admire. He also taps into Miles’s innate compassion by having him connect with one of the clones, and ends the issue on a cliffhanger that will drive a spike through readers’ hearts.

I mentioned it in previous reviews, but Carnero’s artwork continues to impress. She taps into horror elements while drawing the clones, particularly Mindspinner; with his spidery legs, multiple eyes, and clawed hands he truly is more “spider” than “man.” Her fight scenes continue to be immensely dynamic, with Miles and Mindspinner engaging in a fight later in the issue that causes wreckage to a hospital and tests the limits of their respective powers. And in one of the most visually striking images in the issue, Carnero draws Miles hanging upside down and surrounded by his clones while the shadow of the Assessor looms-serving as a visual reminder of the mental and physical toll the being has taken on their lives.

Curiel helps to set the mood with his colors. Most of the issue is set at the lab where Miles and his clones had their initial conflict, with shadows cast everywhere-hinting at the darkness to come. Other scenes set at the hospital fight and at Miles’ home have more natural lighting, representing a more grounded and human feel as Miles’ parents work and live there. Perhaps the most striking use of color comes from a flashback involving the clones, with purple and black shrouding the background and making the Assessor feel even more sinister. Purple also makes a comeback later in the issue, as Mindspinner’s mental blasts are put to the test against Miles’ bright yellow “venom blast”.

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #27 continues to put its own spin on the “Clone Saga” storyline, balancing action and pathos along the way. The issue’s cliffhanger only serves to up the stakes, leading Miles to what is potentially the biggest battle of his career as Spider-Man.

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #27 is available wherever comics are sold.

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #27
4.5

TL;DR

Miles Morales: Spider-Man #27 continues to put its own spin on the “Clone Saga” storyline, balancing action and pathos along the way. The issue’s cliffhanger only serves to up the stakes, leading Miles to what is potentially the biggest battle of his career as Spider-Man.