REVIEW: ‘Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Supergirl Wonder of Tomorrow #1 - But Why Tho

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow #1 is the start of a new, 8 Issue mini-series published by DC comics. Written by Tom King, pencils by Bilquis Evely, colors by Matheus Lopes, and lettered by Clayton Cowles. Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow opens with an incredible monologue given by Ruthye, who is in search of a vicious mercenary to handle a mission she has. That mission? Kill the man responsible for her father’s death, Krem Of The Yellow Hills.

When this Conan-The-Barbarian-style exchange in a bar takes a violent turn in their negotiations, Kara drunkenly steps in to defend Ruthye. The following day, Ruthye extends the contract to Kara after witnessing her bravery the night before.

Supergirl denies the offer at first, but it is Ruthye’s tenacity to follow her that impresses Kara. It’s also the understanding that Supergirl and Ruthye share, which is the loss of their loved ones. After another brief encounter with the mercenary from the bar, and Krem himself. When Supergirl remembers that she’s under a foreign sun and not as fortified as normal, she is hurt but continues to fight. This instills fear in Krem who flees, and accidentally boards Supergirl’s ship moments before it launches into the sky.

This issue caught me completely off guard and I’m almost speechless by how much of a page-turner it was. King demonstrates a master class on how to pace a story with a world of lore behind it but making it all feel common knowledge. King is no stranger to writing emotional comics, so naturally, this issue is bursting with action, sadness, empathy, and a page-turning plot that has left me begging for more.

Artwise, Evely, and Lopes deliver jaw-dropping moments in this first issue. Evely has created a rich fantasy world filled with plains and foreign animals that leap off the page, and every panel has razor-sharp attention to detail. The action sequences have a graceful fluidity to them that helps transition to and from intense moments. The emotions in the writing are also reflected in the artwork, with Evely drawing Kara’s emotions so accurately that they’re palpable.

Every panel in this issue is drawn like a mystical daydream, and it is colored like one too. Lopes uses a bright palette which gives Ruthye’s homeland an empyrean glow. Between the rose-red sunsets and the bright colors of the wilderness that Ruthye wades through, this issue is certainly eye candy.  Furthermore, Cowles lettering, specifically for Ruthye’s monologues is genius. The lettering is effective, easy to read, and doesn’t obstruct the pages.

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow was absolutely my most anticipated comic of the year. Following the creative team’s Twitter hype has proved true! This story is a refreshing blend of classic superhero trope with sword and sorcery themes. The combination of those two genres applied to a character like Supergirl put her in a situation that neither she nor the reader has ever experienced. I am excited to read more and see how King writes another modern classic.

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow #1 is available wherever comics are sold.

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow #1
4.5

TL;DR

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow was absolutely my most anticipated comic of the year. Following the creative team’s Twitter hype has proved true! This story is a refreshing blend of classic superhero trope with sword and sorcery themes. The combination of those two genres applied to a character like Supergirl put her in a situation that neither she nor the reader has ever experienced. I am excited to read more and see how King writes another modern classic.