REVIEW: ‘Non-Stop Spider-Man,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3 is written by Joe Kelly, penciled by Chris Bachalo, inked by Tim Townsend, colored by Marcio Menyz, and lettered by VC’s Travis Lanham. It is published by Marvel Comics. Part 3 of “Big Brain Play” finds Spidey and Norah Winters being chased all over New York City by the Zapata Brothers, as the luchadors’ immense strength and newly enhanced brainpower make them more than a match for the web-slinger. Unbeknownst to Spidey, the rise of the “A-Plus” drug is linked to the malevolent Baron Zemo!

After reviewing this issue, I have to get it off my chest: I love the Zapata Brothers. Their luchador aesthetic, the way they utilize both brawn and brain to battle Spidey, and a late-game revelation make them some of the most interesting foes that Spidey has ever faced. Spidey, for the most part, is running himself ragged as he attempts to say one step ahead of the Zapatas in addition to keeping Norah safe. Kelly’s script encompasses all the best aspects of Spidey-his ability to think on the fly, his desire to protect the innocent, and his trademark mile-a-minute quipping. The last part showcases just HOW tired Spidey is; when his best quip involves a runaway train, it’s proof that he’s had a long day.

The artistic team continues to be the highlight of the series, taking Spidey and Norah from the subway to the skies. Bachalo excels at dynamic action, illustrating sequences that would feel right at home in a massive blockbuster film. These scenes include, but are not limited to, the aforementioned train crash (which involves the Zapatas’ massive monster truck) and Spidey flinging a pair of liquid nitrogen tanks at the brothers — and being on the receiving end of their “Hombre Hammerfist.” Hey, you can’t be a great wrestler without a signature move!  Menyz also drenches his scenery in rich colors, including the Zapatas’ wrestling outfits and Spidey’s trademark red and blue outfit. This also extends to the environment. The subway scenes have a dark blue background, with shadows peppering the corners. Outside, the sky is a crystal clear blue.

Lanham’s lettering is also insanely inventive. I love that he continues to depict Spidey’s spider-sense as actual words, including “Not Fast Enough!” and “Look Out Behind You!” It’s a power that’s meant to warn Spidey of danger, and this is an excellent visual way of depicting it. Other inventive touches to the lettering include depicting a character’s thoughts as a series of arrows that take the reader through an action sequence and opening and closing sequences being spelled out in Spidey’s trademark webbing. Not since Scout’s Honor have I seen a comic with lettering this inventive; it’s as if the letters blend into the art itself.

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3 pits the web-slinger against a new pair of foes, never letting up on the action sequences or frenetic pacing. The next issue promises to see Spidey and Baron Zemo collide, and I’m interested to see how the webhead handles one of Captain America’s deadliest foes.

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3
4

TL;DR

Non-Stop Spider-Man #3 pits the web-slinger against a new pair of foes, never letting up on the action sequences or frenetic pacing. The next issue promises to see Spidey and Baron Zemo collide, and I’m interested to see how the webhead handles one of Captain America’s deadliest foes.