REVIEW: ‘Green Lantern,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Green Lantern #3

Green Lantern #3 is written by Geoffery Thorne, illustrated by Tom Raney and Marco Santucci, colored by Michael Atiyeh, and lettered by Rob Leigh. It is published by DC Comics. “Cosmology Lesson” picks up after the events of Green Lantern #2, which saw the Green Lantern’s central power battery on Oa destroyed in a massive explosion. Stranded on a strange planet, John Stewart is sent hurtling through his memories as he attempts to piece together the mystery of how he got to his current position. Meanwhile, Jo Mullein adapting to her new role as Councillor of Oa and one of the few remaining Lanterns with a working Power Ring and touches on the fates of Simon Baz and Keli Quintela.

With this issue, the Green Lanterns inch ever closer to their status in the Future State timeline. The idea of multiple Green Lanterns being stranded behind enemy lines, or worse in the icy cold vacuum of space, is frightening enough. Still, even more frightening is the concept of who could destroy an object that houses pure willpower and why they would do it. Thorne has built up a mystery that simmers throughout the issue and leaves the Lanterns, particularly Stewart, in unfamiliar territory. His script also features elements similar to those in Star Trek and Mass Effect, with the former being the most prominent as Stewart chooses to explore the far reaches of the galaxy with his fellow lanterns.

Raney’s art for “Cosmology Lesson” takes a tour of Stewart’s history, casting various figures from his past in a new light. The issue begins with Stewart seemingly waking up in high school before shifting to the depths of outer space and a sunlit beach. Raney gets to design multiple looks for Stewart over the course of the issue, including a Green Lantern-styled letterman’s jacket for his high school flashback and a new uniform that feels inspired by Star Trek. Atiyeh’s colors are eye-grabbing, from the cool blue of outer space to the golden dusty hues of the planet that Stewart finds himself on.

Santucci is no slouch in the artistic department himself. His segment of the issue puts a heavy focus on Mullein, particularly on the opening page. Within the space of three panels, the devastation of the Battery’s destruction is hammered home. Various Lanterns are shown captured by alien races, and rescue crews pick through the wreckage of Oa. Mullein starts off recording a message, poised and stoic, yet has to take a deep breath to compose herself toward the end.

Thorne, Santucci, and Atiyeh also present an emotional reunion between Baz and Keli and even give Baz a new upgrade to compensate for his missing Lantern ring. I enjoy the interplay between Muellin, Baz, and Keli as their reactions to the devastation feel utterly human and gives them the chance to step up in the annals of Green Lantern lore.

Green Lantern #3 sets up a mystery that inches the Green Lanterns closer to their Future State status and puts the spotlight on lesser-known Lanterns. This is shaping up to be the Green Lantern book of my dreams and the fresh take the series needed. I highly recommend it for sci-fi and superhero fans alike.

Green Lantern #3 is available wherever comics are sold.

Green Lantern #3
4.5

TL;DR

Green Lantern #3 sets up a mystery that inches the Green Lanterns closer to their Future State status and puts the spotlight on lesser-known Lanterns. This is shaping up to be the Green Lantern book of my dreams and the fresh take the series needed. I highly recommend it for sci-fi and superhero fans alike.