REVIEW: ‘Star Wars: Doctor Aphra,’ Issue #10

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Doctor Aphra #10 - But Why Tho?

Doctor Aphra #10 begins the series’ turn in the War of the Bounty Hunters crossover event. The issue is written by Alyssa Wong with penciler Ray-Anthony Height, inker Victor Olazaba, color artist Rachelle Rosenberg, and letterer VC’s Joe Caramagna, published by Marvel. Aphra and Sana Starros have to stop a hostage crisis, prevent an ancient Nihil engine from blowing, and satisfy a corporate client, all without dying first. Meanwhile, Ariole and Lucky are doing… something.

Unfortunately, this issue suffers the same affliction as other series’ first issues in their War of the Bounty Hunters arcs, chiefly Bounty HuntersIt’s so caught up in concluding its previous arc that basically nothing happens. Sure, Aphra and Starros bag their look and escape their buyer to swindle another day. But it’s a prolonged encounter interrupted only briefly by a secondary plot with two characters with no discernable personalities in this issue alone, whose mission is just vague enough to be confusing but clear enough to know it means competition for the much more enjoyable Aphra and Starros.

Their rapport is great, and the comic would have been better served had it cut out the other subplot altogether, given them more to do, and brought the other characters in on future issues when they can be given more to actually do. The High Republic connection is certainly appreciated, though. It was interesting seeing Aphra talk about the Nihil tech. We still have no idea what becomes of the Nihil or their hyperspace tech, but it’s nice to see little hints of how folks react to them hundreds of years later.

There isn’t much of note to say about the art. There are too many large, empty rooms. However, if you haven’t read Aphra recently and are just jumping in again for the crossover, Aphra’s design is slightly different than originally. Her face is drawn a bit rounder and less angular now, and she has a more distinct personality to her face and expressions. It’s subtle but certainly noticeable.

The best part of the coloring is in the panels filled with fire. The explosion itself is drawn and colored intensely; you can feel the heat of it all as the red, and orange glow reflects off of everything around it, especially the characters. That heat glow does a lot to make the fire feel more realistic. The lettering is done in a typical Star Wars font with no SFX or anything particular of note.

Doctor Aphra #10 is a benign start to the series’ War of the Bounty Hunters arc. Its conclusion leaves me willing to believe that some good following issues may ensue. But as a beginning, the story is too attached to its previous arc and does little, seemingly, to prepare for the coming story until the final panels. Nevertheless, there is still a good High Republic reference and nice banter between Starros and Aphra.

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #10 is available wherever comics are sold.

Doctor Aphra #10
3

TL;DR

Doctor Aphra #10 is a benign start to the series’ War of the Bounty Hunters arc. Its conclusion leaves me willing to believe that some good following issues may ensue. But as a beginning, the story is too attached to its previous arc and does little, seemingly, to prepare for the coming story until the final panels. Nevertheless, there is still a good High Republic reference and nice banter between Starros and Aphra.