REVIEW: ‘Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1 is written by Steve Orlando, illustrated by Bernard Chang, colored by David Curiel, and lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles. It is published by Marvel Comics. In the alternate universe of Heroes Reborn, the X-Men were decimated by the Squadron Supreme-with Professor Charles Xavier being fatally cut down by the Power Princess and Magneto being crippled. Years later, Magneto is telepathically contacted by Xavier on the Astral Plane and resolves to rescue his friend, assembling the Mutant Force to break telepath Emma Frost out of her cell. The clock is racing as Magneto races to save Xavier while the Squadron descends on Island M.

The fate of the X-Men was referenced in Heroes Reborn #2, with Hyperion saying that he intended to track down the Mutant Force and place them in the Negative Zone. Mutant Force expands upon that line, showcasing what exactly happened to the X-Men in this new world. While this isn’t the first time that Magneto has led the X-Men in an alternate reality-the standout story being the Age of ApocalypseMutant Force manages to touch upon the trademark “superpower as a minority” that has ran throughout the X-Men franchise. Mutantkind has been reduced to a fraction of its numbers and is struggling to survive in a world that wants it dead-and even worse; some of those people include the world’s so-called greatest heroes. Say whatever you will about the Avengers and the Fantastic Four, but at the very least, they weren’t actively planning mutant genocide.

Orlando’s script also provides an insight into Magneto’s headspace and how he continues to be one of the most driven men in the Marvel universe. Magneto is willing to do anything-including traveling to a psychic wasteland to save his friend. “I didn’t save Charles then. I will now,” he tells Emma in one panel, a  single sentence that underlines the immense amounts of guilt and grief he’s carried with him over the years. Orlando also perfectly captures the personalities of the other X-Men, including Rogue’s stubborn defiance to back down from a fight and Emma’s acerbic nature. The issue also ends on a massive cliffhanger that makes me wish this wasn’t a one-shot; there’s plenty of room for this story to continue.

Artwise, Chang provides new designs for the X-Men that hew to their history and feature streamlined designs. Magneto, for example, wears a red-and-black uniform that includes his trademark helmet but discards his cape for a more form-fitting ensemble. Jubilee and Rogue still have their trademark shades and bomber jacket, respectively, and Emma still wears her fur-lined white cape. Chang also draws intense action sequences, with Curiel providing a color palette that grows darker and darker with the escalating violence. Perhaps the darkest moment is at the beginning of the issue, which depicts the “Mutant Massacre”-an event that more than lives up to its name.

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1 filters the X-Men mythos through the Heroes Reborn universe, resulting in a tale that’s equal parts action-packed and poignant. The Heroes Reborn storyline has continued to provide new looks at Marvel’s heroes, and I’m glad the X-Men got to be a part of that, even if it was for a little while.

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1
4.5

TL;DR

Heroes Reborn: Magneto and the Mutant Force #1 filters the X-Men mythos through the Heroes Reborn universe, resulting in a tale that’s equal parts action-packed and poignant. The Heroes Reborn storyline has continued to provide new looks at Marvel’s heroes, and I’m glad the X-Men got to be a part of that, even if it was for a little while.