REVIEW: ‘Heroes Reborn,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Heroes Reborn #3 - But Why Tho?

Heroes Reborn #3 is published by  Marvel Comics. Like Heroes Reborn #2, the issue consists of two stories. “Race Through The Dread Dimension” is written by Jason Aaron, illustrated by Federico Vicentini, and colored by Matt Milla. “The Silent Inferno” is also written by Aaron, with pencils by Ed McGuinness, inks by Mark Morales, and colors by Matt Wilson. The entire issue is lettered by VC’s Cory Petit.

“Race Through The Dread Dimension” features the Squadron Supreme’s supersonic hero Blur literally racing for his life after the Silver Witch—first introduced in Heroes Reborn #1—steals part of his soul. In the process, both of them are confronted with the idea that reality may not be what they think it is. “The Silent Inferno” finds Maya Lopez—aka Echo—trapped in the Ravencroft Institute, using her newfound Phoenix powers to keep the murderous inmates in line until she’s approached by Blade.

In the same way that “Escape From The Negative Zone” drew comparisons between Hyperion and Superman, “Race Through The Dread Dimension” draws parallels between the Blur and the Flash. It’s fun to see how Aaron and Vicentini twist different Marvel heroes and villains to fit the Flash mythos: Ursa Major takes the place of Gorilla Grodd (there’s even a Grizzly City!) and the Blur finds himself racing against Ghost Rider. However, while the Flash’s powers are rooted in science, the Blur’s spring from magic—which is something else that he and the Silver Witch share in common.  Aaron also continues to plant seeds of doubt in the Squadron’s mind about their new reality, which no doubt is hinting at a confrontation between the Squadron and the Avengers at this storyline’s end.

Vicentini is well known for his insanely hyperkinetic action sequences, particularly in Amazing Spider-Man. It only makes sense that he’d excel drawing a story where both hero and villain possess super speed. The Blur, true to his namesake, is often depicted as a streak of black and yellow bouncing from location to location. Vicentini also gets to draw multiple locations, from the aforementioned Grizzly City, which consists of massive mountains of snow (and angry, hungry grizzly bears), to the Dread Dimension, populated by the hulking Mindless Ones. Milla’s colors also reflect the chaotic nature of the story, particularly in the Dread Dimension; it’s all hellish red flames and black molten rock, punctuated by the black and yellow of Blur’s costume and the emerald green of the Silver Witch’s.

“The Silent Inferno” is a brief interlude that dives into Maya Lopez’s head, and how she handles the power of the Phoenix. She is scared of it-and rightfully so, as previous hosts have nearly shattered the galaxy. However, Aaron shows how she manages to use it for good and how she could be the Avengers’ secret weapon against the Squadron. McGuinness gives Maya’s Echo costume a Phoenix-inspired design including a Phoenix-shaped breastplate and golden trim, with flames dancing around her. With Wilson’s colors, these flames give off a warm, heavenly glow that will capture readers’ eyes. I’m fairly sure that each issue of Heroes Reborn will feature a backup story slowly reassembling the Avengers; however, that’ll make the final battle all that much sweeter.

Heroes Reborn #3 features a chaotic-yet-entertaining story that continues to explore the different dynamics of the Avengers and the Squadron Supreme. The next issue will feature Doctor Spectrum—the Squadron’s Green Lantern analogue—going up against Rocket Raccoon and that sounds like a comic I HAVE to read.

Heroes Reborn #3 is available wherever comics are sold.

Heroes Reborn #3
4.5

TL;DR

Heroes Reborn #3 features a chaotic-yet-entertaining story that continues to explore the different dynamics of the Avengers and the Squadron Supreme. The next issue will feature Doctor Spectrum—the Squadron’s Green Lantern analogue—going up against Rocket Raccoon and that sounds like a comic I HAVE to read.