REVIEW: ‘Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Batman/Fortnite Zero Point #2 - But Why Tho?

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2 is published by DC Comics, concept and story consultation by Donald Mustard, written by Christos Gage, art by Reilly Brown, inks by Nelson Faro DeCastro, colors by John Kalisz, and letters by Andworld. Finding himself trapped on an island filled with hostile combatants, surrounded by a mysterious storm, and bereft of his memories, Batman struggles to piece together the mystery surrounding him.

Presenting a comic’s story through nothing but an internal monologue cannot be easy on a writer. Trying to keep the information flowing smoothly in a way that maintains interest without any back and forth between characters has to present a unique challenge. When the character is constantly having their memories taken from them, I can’t begin to imagine working around an additional wrench in the works. Having said that, I feel compelled to tip my hat to writer Gage. This is the setup he was confronted with. And while I can’t say the writer manages to master the difficult situation, the result is better than I would’ve expected it to be.

As you have probably surmised, Batman is our unfortunate amnesiac who spends Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2  struggling to find a way off the island where the constantly renewing battle takes place. His only initial aids are the clues he’s left for himself. As the issue progresses, Batman, along with help from an ally he discovers and convinces to aid him, manages to slowly piece together a working theory on how this bizarre island works and how they might escape it.

Writer Gage does an admirable job of delivering Batman in this permanent state of semi-confusion. As long as one ignores how Batman keeps catching up on his previous theories about the island while only having 22 minutes to work with and still make more progress, the story delivers the Caped Crusader in his full detective mode well.

Gage even manages to work in some emotional beats into Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2 as some of the experiments go awry or are interrupted by random encounters with the other inhabitants of the island. These moments lend a bit more humanity to what is otherwise a rather analytical story.

The art does a good job of capturing both the physical and mental states of its protagonist. Artist Brown does a good job of showing Batman’s emotions when they are either for himself or those around him. Since speech is prohibited, there are numerous points where Batman’s expression is a bit too on the nose for most comics. But, given that his face is the quickest way for him to express himself, it makes sense that his expressions in these moments would be a bit exaggerated to convey his sentiments clearly to those around him.

Perhaps the best element of Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2 is the vibrant colorwork by Kalisz. The colors in this book do a great job of bringing the energy and bizarre nature of this situation to the forefront of every panel. With some sharp palette shifts between scenes, this book’s presentation continues to feel fresh throughout its story.

Rounding out the presentation of the book is Andworld’s letters. The lettering here stays out of the art’s way while also allowing the reader to follow along with Batman’s many musings easily.

While I feel this story continues to be hampered by its setup and concept restraints, I have to acknowledge that this issue did a much better job working its concept into a cohesive tale than I would’ve expected. While still not great, it’s getting better.

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #2
3.5

TL;DR

While I feel this story continues to be hampered by its setup and concept restraints, I have to acknowledge that this issue did a much better job working its concept into a cohesive tale than I would’ve expected. While still not great, it’s getting better.