Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Batman/Fornite Zero Point #1

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 is published by DC Comics, concept and story consultation by Donald Mustard, written by Christos Gage, art by Reilly Brown, inks by Nelson Faro DeCastro, colors by John Kalisz, and letters by Andworld. A crack in the fabric of reality has opened up over Gotham. Batman’s attempts to investigate the anomaly result in his being transported into another world. 

Comic book releases as tie-ins to other entertainment products are nothing new. The most famous example being the Marvel Comics Secret War that launched a toy line, Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 joins this history of product tie-ins with little notable success. At least from a storytelling standpoint. 

Our story opens with Jim Gordon, presumably as Police Commissioner, updating Batman on the city’s response to the huge purple tear in the sky. Upon imparting some orders to Gordon, Batman sets out to take a closer look at the anomaly. On his way, he runs into Harly Quinn, who seems eager to enter the rift. Batman finds this behavior bizarre, even for the often unpredictable Quinn. Then, for perhaps the first time in comics history, Quinn beats up Batman so she can leap headlong into the rift.

I can only assume this whole sequence is here as a nod because Harley previously appeared in Fortnite years ago. 

While trying to understand what is going on, a distracted Batman is knocked into the rift by an unseen assailant. He soon finds himself coming to a brightly colored world of violence where a rampaging storm swirls around an ever-shrinking landscape, and all are denied their voices and memories.

The remainder of the book’s narrative sees Batman struggle to survive the frenzied melee that forms around him. The complete lack of self-preservation on the part of the others present, except for another Gothamite who found their way to this strange world, is the most shocking part of the whole ordeal for Batman. Why is everyone so recklessly throwing their lives away even as the encroaching storm threatens to consume them all?

Shocking no one, Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 delivers little in the way of a sensible plot. Its only purpose is to mash the characters of Batman with the world of Fortnite. This is made even more awkward than that sentence implies, given that I’m fairly certain Batman has not been transported to some fictional world where the game takes place, but rather the game itself. Hence why there is no speech, and no one seems to care about dying. These are player avatars and not actual people.

The art in this book does a good job of mashing the two aesthetics together. Artist Brown manages to deliver line work that does a good job of fitting both worlds. Rather than having the art itself shift to deliver the change in scenery, the job of contrasting the two worlds is left to Kalisz’s colors. The dark tones of Gotham are an obvious stark contrast to the bright primary colors of Fortnite’s manic universe.

Lastly, we have the book’s lettering. Andworld does a commendable job delivering what story there is in a clear and concise way to the reader. 

When all is said and done, Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 delivers little for anyone who isn’t a big Fortnite fan. And even then, I wouldn’t expect a ton of return. This book could lead to a story that becomes something bigger than just popular product placement, but I’m not gonna hold my breath. 

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1
2.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Batman/Fortnite: Zero Point #1 delivers little for anyone who isn’t a big Fortnite fan. And even then, I wouldn’t expect a ton of return. This book could lead to a story that becomes something bigger than just popular product placement, but I’m not gonna hold my breath.