REVIEW: ‘The Picture of Everything Else,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

the Picture of Everything #3

The Picture of Everything Else #3 is published by Vault Comics. It comes from the creative team of writer Dan Watters, artist Kishore Mohan, and letterer Aditya Bidikar. Marcel and Alphonse have finally had their reunion at Basil’s home. Though the two seem to have varying ideas of what the intent behind the reunion entails. Alphonse is ecstatic to bring his former lover into Basil’s machinations. But Marcel notes the gun he has hidden in his bags when Alphonse steps away to help Basil.

However, before Marcel can put his plan into action, Basil insists the three go out on the town. It is now that Marcel looks at the sky and sees the crimson blot left at the end of the previous issue. When Basil is pressed about it, he plays coy and begins discussing the history of Paris. Marcel grows increasingly confused and frustrated at how casually the people of Paris react to what amounts to a natural disaster. But for Basil, everything is going according to plan. A plan that grows more bizarre and terrifying as every second passes.

With The Picture of Everything Else #3, we’ve reached the point where the villain’s goal is finally clear. Unfortunately, the road to get there is a mixed bag. The story seems to revel in its own telling, making some of the pages feel like a terrible slog. Basil, as the villain, loves to draw out his exposition. This isn’t an uncommon trait in Victorian-era antagonists, but in this case, his monologues feel laborious. Where before the story seemed intent on cleverly telling a story, this issue feels as though it wants to stop and revel in that same creativity. Little is done to push the narrative forward until the very end, which doesn’t make for the easiest read.

The art feels similarly mixed. The panels of wide-open areas and landscapes feel vibrant and detailed. But the closer the art gets to the individual characters, the more often that same detail is lost. Several panels that focus on a single character often see their eyes uneven or facial features simplified. In a scene with many characters, this wouldn’t be that big of a deal, but when one character is the sole focus of the panel, it is unmissable.

The colors are much more consistent and remain gorgeous. The watercolor aesthetic applied to each panel helps evoke the style of the story’s setting. There are some minor issues with the sky losing its red hue from time to time. The letters are solid and are never difficult to read nor does it intrude on the art.

Overall, I felt a little let down by The Picture of Everything Else #3. The first two issues contained a fair amount of intrigue and horror interspersed with some meandering plot. But with the third issue, it feels like the meandering is here to stay. There are bright spots in this issue, but they all fall in the latter half, and it can feel a bit cumbersome to get there. Overall this series still has potential, so if you’ve been reading it’s worth grabbing. But if you aren’t sure whether it’s for you, you’ll probably want to keep waiting on it.

The Picture of Everything Else #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

The Picture of Everything Else #3
2.5

TL;DR

I felt a little let down by The Picture of Everything Else #3. The first two issues contained a fair amount of intrigue and horror interspersed with some meandering plot. But with the third issue, it feels like the meandering is here to stay. There are bright spots in this issue, but they all fall in the latter half, and it can feel a bit cumbersome to get there. Overall this series still has potential, so if you’ve been reading it’s worth grabbing. But if you aren’t sure whether it’s for you, you’ll probably want to keep waiting on it.