REVIEW: ‘Green Lantern,’ Issue #1

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Green Lantern #1 - But Why Tho?

Green Lantern #1 is written by Geoffery Thorne, illustrated by Dexter Soy and Marco Santucci, colored by Alex Sinclair, and lettered by Rob Leigh. It is published by DC Comics. Following the formation of the United Planets, John Stewart must deal with the Green Lantern Corps’ newest member Keli Quintela-better known as Teen Lantern-and her friction with the Guardians of the Universe, as well as emissaries from the Sorcerer’s World Zerox who seek vengeance against the Guardians.

After writing the main story for the Future State: Green Lantern miniseries, Thorne returns to the Green Lantern mythos and takes the Corps in a new direction. He excels at writing Stewart, who steps up to the plate as a leader and manages to handle all the challenges thrown his way with ease. The other standout through the issue is Keli, who previously played a large part in Brian Michael Bendis’ Young Justice series. Keli acts like one would expect a teenager to act-albeit one with a massive will-powered gauntlet attached to her arm. She flies in the face of the Guardians when they ask to inspect her gauntlet, but at the same time, she also takes awe at the sight of different alien cultures.

Thorne manages to touch on all of the popular Green Lanterns within the space of the issue. Simon Baz appears as Stewart’s right-hand man, and Hal Jordan has a heart-to-heart with Stewart initially, which has extra weight when you consider their shared history. Even Kilowog and Guy Gardner show up, as well as Sinestro. If you have a favorite Lantern, chances are they make an appearance in this issue.

Both Soy and Santucci deliver sci-fi spectacle with their artwork, especially Santucci in particular. Santucci draws the scenes featuring the delegation of the United Planets, while Soy draws the battle sequences. The former features a collection of multiple aliens, including a female leader from Colu Prime (better known as the homeworld of Brainiac.) Soy gives a new Kryptonian-inspired robe to Stewart, reflecting Superman’s role in creating the United Planets, and makes the Zerox delegates stand out as they literally resemble the elements. From a female sorcerer who is entirely composed of water to a warrior who is literally aflame, these beings look like they are composed of pure magic. It’s as if a Dungeons & Dragons campaign was dropped into the middle of Star Trek.

Rounding out the creative team is Sinclair on colors. As you’d expect, green plays a large role in this series, especially when the Lanterns use their rings. Baz’s costume has glowing green elements to it, while the city of Oa features multiple glowing green lights. Even Leigh’s letters take on a green hue and the occasional blue when the Guardians use their telepathic abilities.

Green Lantern #1 sets up a bold new direction for the Green Lantern mythos and looks to place John Stewart into the limelight at long last. Anyone who’s a fan of Justice League Unlimited or Star Trek: Discovery will definitely want to pick this book up.

Green Lantern #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Green Lantern #1
5

TL;DR

Green Lantern #1 sets up a bold new direction for the Green Lantern mythos and looks to place John Stewart into the limelight at long last. Anyone who’s a fan of Justice League Unlimited or Star Trek: Discovery will definitely want to pick this book up.