REVIEW: ‘Silk,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Silk #1 - But Why Tho?Silk #1 is written by Maurene Goo, illustrated by Takeshi Miyazawa, colored by Ian Herring, and lettered by VC’S Ariana Maher. It is published by Marvel Comics. The issue follows Cindy Moonbetter known as the superheroine Silkwho juggles crime-fighting with a journalism career at the Threats and Menaces website. However, Cindy’s latest assignment finds her investigating a grisly murder and puts her mentor J. Jonah Jameson in danger!

This series marks the first solo outing for Silk since 2016, and it is a much-welcomed return. Previous Silk writer Robbie Thompson did a great job of establishing Cindy’s supporting cast and life after she left the bunker where she had been trapped for a decade, and Goo effortlessly picks up that baton. From Cindy’s relationship with her brother Albert and Jamesonincluding the return of Jameson’s nickname “Analog” with Cindy and Albert dealing with the trauma he sufferedto utilizing her arachnid abilities to fight crime, Goo immerses the reader in the narrative and reminds them of what makes Cindy such a great character. The only real difference is Cindy’s place of work, which recently underwent a name change in Amazing Spider-Man. And even then, she’s still doing the same work.

Joining Goo on artistic duties is Miyazawa, who has previously illustrated Marvel Comics titles including Runaways and Mary Jane Loves Spider-Man. The former title works to his advantage, especially with the fight scenes. Cindy’s speed and web-slinging abilities come into play as she literally leaps from panel to panel, kicking and webbing opponents. Miyazawa’s characters also feel distinct in terms of age and body typeCindy looks like a woman in her mid-20’s, while Jameson’s face is lined with wrinkles and his temples are graying. The main villain, who makes an appearance towards the end of the issue, has an extremely terrifying and inhuman appearance.

Rounding out the artistic team are Herring and Maher, with the former giving the book a color setting to match its protagonist. Red, black, and white figure prominently into Cindy’s life from her Silk suit to the clothing she wears in her civilian life. In perhaps one of the most perfect coincidences, a fashion designer offers her a set of clothing that happens to consist of a black top and pants with a red coat. Maher also presents Cindy’s internal monologues in white caption boxes with red letters, which also fits the color scheme.

What makes me extremely happy is that this is Cindy’s first solo adventure in a long time. While I’ve enjoyed her appearances in Amazing Spider-Man and Agents of Atlas, it’s great to see her in an adventure that plays to her strengths. And even though it’s a slow burn, it acts as the perfect complement to the stories that made me fall in love with the character.

Silk #1 features the return of the web-slinging heroine, with all the wit and humanity readers have come to expect from Cindy Moon. With a new threat looming on the horizon, and the events of this debut issue placing her in an unexpected position, fans will no doubt enjoy Cindy’s return to solo superheroes.

Silk #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Slik #1
4.5

TL;DR

Silk #1 features the return of the web-slinging heroine, with all the wit and humanity readers have come to expect from Cindy Moon. With a new threat looming on the horizon, and the events of this debut issue placing her in an unexpected position, fans will no doubt enjoy Cindy’s return to solo superheroes.