REVIEW: ‘Star Wars Adventures,’ Issue #4

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Star Wars Adventures #4

Star Wars Adventures #4 is a two-story comic from IDW Publishing. The first story, “Life Day Part 2,” is written by Michael Moreci, with art by Megan Levens, colors by Charlie Kirchoff, and letters by James M. Wood. The second story, “Credits,” is written by Jordan Clark with art by Yael Nathan and letters by James M. Wood.

Star Wars Adventures #4 was delayed several times over, and I was really looking forward to the conclusion to the previous issue’s primary story, “Life Day.” Unfortunately, the conclusion fell rather flat. The gorgeous colors were absent for most of the story until the very end, and the plot, which originally focuses specifically on the friendship between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan and the Wookiees, was given a back seat to a motivationless Trandoshian who captured Qui-Gon and was very braggadocious about it.

That trandoshian’s design was really cool, though. I feel like trandoshians are often depicted almost awkwardly in Star Wars media, especially in Star Wars: Rebels. But here, they are given intense and very detailed spikes on their heads in addition to some detailed scales along their arms. It’s a nice detail that makes the otherwise not particularly enthralling conclusion to this caper at least nice to look at. That is before the story concludes and returns to the gorgeous depictions of the Wookiees and Kashyyyk. There are some subtle backgrounds that make one of my favorite planets shine, and the way that the giant creatures are depicted is still wonderful. I especially continue to appreciate the colorful ways the Wookiees decorate their hair.

“Credits” surprised me, and I’m still not sure if it’s in a good or a bad way. The story is about Beckett and Val from Solo and, correct me if I’m wrong, but they were not depicted as nearly as loving and emotional a couple in the movie as they are here. I was thrown completely off when the story’s plot revolved around Val narrating romantic gestures Beckett kept pulling on her. I had virtually no recollection that their relationship took this form or candor.

The plot is thin, which is fine because it’s a short in a series meant to be more about character moments than deep plot threads. But even in its thinness, despite being narrated by Val, the story still revolves entirely around Beckett. Val was treated poorly as a character in Solo, and this story does not treat her any better. It feels wrong for the story to be narrated by her but be pretty much entirely about Beckett and not take her own feelings into account.

Yet, I found myself oddly endeared by their relationship and wanting to see more of it. Which was odd, considering I have not had any interest in Solo since its release or much of the other tie-in media around the movie. I think it’s more the art’s success in depicting these characters fondly than the story itself, but something about them being a loving couple had me inexplicably hooked. Beckett’s face is much softer and less punchable than Woody Harrelson’s, and there are some very soft and pretty backgrounds that help set a good mood. In both stories, the lettering is just-right, in stand Star Wars comic fashion.

Star Wars Adventures #3 isn’t a bad issue, but it didn’t live up to my hopes following the previous issue. It’s worth finishing the “Life Day” story, though, and “Credits” is an interesting look at two characters I never thought I’d be interested in seeing again.

Star Wars Adventures #4 is available wherever comics are sold.

Star Wars Adventures #4
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TL;DR

Star Wars Adventures #3 isn’t a bad issue, but it didn’t live up to my hopes following the previous issue. It’s worth finishing the “Life Day” story though, and “Credits” is an interesting look at two characters I never thought I’d be interested in seeing again.