REVIEW: ‘Haha,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Haha #3

Haha #3 is published by Image Comics, written by W. Maxwell Prince, with art by Roger Langridge. While the last issue explored the struggles of a woman’s past, this issue keeps its feet planted firmly in the present as we meet our protagonist, a struggling mime who just wants to entertain. But times are tough. But even hard times can get better with a friend. Luckily a new chum may be right around the corner.

The previous two issues of Haha have delivered emotional tales of individuals who have found themselves in less than great situations. These stories have shown the trauma and hardships of the struggles life throws at us even when the bad things that keep coming our way are no fault of ours.

The other signature of this series has been how ambiguous the ending of the issues have been. As I walk away from each issue, I find myself wondering what exactly the creative team meant for me to take from the story. This ambiguity is ratcheted up even further for Haha #3 as the entire book is devoid of dialogue.

They say silence is golden, and that certainly seems true for our unnamed protagonist. As a street mime by trade, he works in silence and seems to prefer his time kept quiet. Going so far as to watch his tv on mute. Unfortunately, being a mime doesn’t bring in the cash, and the rent is coming due. In a desperate attempt to make some cash, our protagonist follows the suggestion of an errant flyer and heads to the dump to search for copper wire he can sell to a junk shop. While perusing through the junk, he comes across a discarded robot that is believed to be defective. In short order, the two become friends, and the robot soon has a spot in our star’s performances.

Haha #3 sees the world get a bit brighter for our protagonist as his show, aided by the friendly robot, soon begins to bring in some money. But perhaps more importantly is the genuine companionship the robot provides.

However, the good things never seem to last long enough, and the robot’s maker soon appears, demanding the robot be returned. The duo is heartbroken at the prospect of being separated. But alas, backed up by the police, the robot’s maker soon hauls the robot away. But such injustice cannot be taken lying down. And our protagonist resolves to rescue his only friend.

While the story of Haha #3 maintains the same focus on the often overwhelming trials life throws at us that the previous stories did, the art in this entry is noticeably different. Rather than leaning into the hard edges of the story’s tone, artist Langridge delivers a more comic strip look to this tale. While the contrast of art and tone feels reasonable for the story, it feels out of place due to how odd a choice it is when compared to the rest of the series.

When all is mimed and done(see what I did there?) Haha #3 delivers another rough story of bad things happening to decent people. While its silent approach is novel, I feel like its presence keeps the story from landing as solidly as the previous issues did.

Haha #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Haha #3
3.5

TL;DR

When all is mimed and done(see what I did there?) Haha #3 delivers another rough story of bad things happening to decent people. While its silent approach is novel, I feel like its presence keeps the story from landing as solidly as the previous issues did.