REVIEW: ‘Solar Opposites’ Season 2 Promises More Crazy Antics

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Solar Opposites Season 2

Solar Opposites Season 2 returns as the Shlorpian crew continues attempting to escape the clutches of planet Earth. From the minds of Justin Roiland and Mike McMahan, two of the creators behind the hit series Rick and Morty, gift us with season two of the hit adult animation Solar Opposites exclusively on the Hulu streaming service.

Solar Opposites is a show about four aliens who crash-landed on Earth and are now attempting to assimilate into American society while trying to fix their ship before their pupa transforms into their final phase and terraforms the planet making it fit to call their new homeworld. The team, comprised of Korvo (Justin Roiland), Terry (Thomas Middleditch), Yumyulack (Sean Giambrone), and Jesse (Mary Mack), combine the comedy of viewing human culture through the eyes of extraterrestrials while using their sci-fi technology to cope with the throes of modern life.

I had the chance to watch the entire second season while also having reviewed the first season (go check it out!), and found that my praise for the blending of sci-fi and comedy continues to deliver to a high standard.

Consider that Solar Opposites Season 2 continues with a lot of the same themes from the prior season that made it such a unrelenting hit. This is where the show’s comedy really comes to life. Season 2 highlights the obscurities of things we’ve constructed in our own societies that, when scrutinized, come across as wildly absurd. The second episode, “The Earth Eraser,” dives deep into the world of dinner parties and the cliché of guests that attend them. Terry becomes obsessed with attending dinner parties and is pressured into inviting Korvo after he threatens to vaporize the planet. Meanwhile, Korvo flails at small talk and, feeling socially awkward and instantly becomes a pariah of the group. He then decides to go to Washington to fund lobbyists to criminalize dinner parties. The underlying humor of the episode is the sheer moronic one-upmanship of the benial conversation from the other dinner guests talking about the most niche of topics.

Each episode continues to craft that unique take on human culture, as seen in episode three, “The Lake House Device.” Korvo uses a device similar to the time-traveling mailbox from the film The Lake House to manipulate Terry into developing a stronger work ethic.  Whereas Yumyulack, tired of being bullied in school, decides to inject himself with ‘BDE’ a.k.a. big dick energy to win over his peers. This show is utterly absurd, and I just can’t get enough of it.

The characters themselves continue to be brought to life by some amazing actors. One of the standouts from the prior season that continues to shine in the most ridiculous way is Thomas Middleditch, who voices Terry. Terry often imitates a low-level side of popular culture, referencing dubiously popular shows with smaller fan bases and wearing t-shirts that must have come off the discount rack at a bargain store. Terry is besotted with Earth culture and connects the crew to the planet. Middleditch’s comedic delivery really comes through in the most bizarre ways, and it pairs so well his infectious vocal energy that brings the character to life. But I can’t only alienate one character.

Justin Roiland’s Korvo is heartwarmingly lovable in a grumpy, overbearing way as the head of the house constantly competing with himself over trying to do his job but falling into some of the minor joys of Earth. Yumyulack, played by Sean Giambrone, continues to be the angriest alien on this side of the galaxy, threatening to constantly murder anyone who gets in his way. Despite probably this being the most aggressive performance I’ve seen from Giambrone, his casting is perfect for the role and he clearly enjoys it. Mary Mack’s sweet voice of Jesse serves as a bright contrast to the males in the room, but pairs so well with Terry’s light comedic role, yet when she goes off the jokes hit so much funnier from her character. It’s just such a dynamic group of characters, and voiced by such an enigmatic group, to spend your time laughing along with.

The animation continues to be solid, utilizing the same artists from Rick and Morty. This should come as no surprise, given the latter is now a four-season veteran and the current show is now in its second season.

The worry with a second season for an original show such as this is if the creators will be able to replicate those variables that made the first season land with such emphasis. Looking back on episodes such as the red goobler in “The Booster Manifold,” “The P.A.T.R.I.C.I.A. Device,” and the Manc Ave, and the plot that caused many emotions, the war of the wall and the loss of Molly, the showrunners have kept the ball rolling, coming up with innovative comedic stories that keep me wanting more.

Additionally, the first season was hampered with concerns from fans of adult animation of how does this really differentiate itself from a Rick and Morty. To this I’d say, that while the two shows share identical animation styles and the voice work from Roiland, Solar Opposites Season 2 has carved out its own trajectory with a plot I’d more likely compare to 3rd Rock from the Sun.

Solar Opposites has honestly hit it out of the park again. The show delivers the perfect variety of societal comedy to provide relief from the humdrum of everyday life. It is a seriously funny show, with jokes that seem to hit on a vast number of entertaining levels. The re-watch value of this show is through the roof, with satire you can binge again and again. Hulu, fund this show forever, please.

Solar Opposites Season 2 is available exclusively on Hulu on March 26.

Solar Opposites Season 2
  • 8.5/10
    Rating - 8.5/10
8.5/10

TL;DR

Solar Opposites has honestly hit it out of the park again. The show delivers the perfect variety of societal comedy to provide relief from the humdrum of everyday life. It is a seriously funny show, with jokes that seem to hit on a vast number of entertaining levels. The re-watch value of this show is through the roof, with satire you can binge again and again. Hulu, fund this show forever, please.