REVIEW: ‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #27

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Captain Marvel #27 - But Why Tho?

Captain Marvel #27 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Kelly Thompson, with art by David Lopez, colors by Triona Farrell, and letters by Clayton Cowles. Returning from the frozen future having failed to apprehend Ove, Carol summarily broke up with her boyfriend believing it was the right thing to do. Now, Carol Danvers is struggling with the emotional damage of recent events. While she may be “The Boss of Space”, one thing she definitely isn’t the boss of is her emotions. Luckily, she isn’t alone.

Processing emotional hurts can be tough. Even for superheroes. As a problem, one cannot simply punch away, though not for lack of trying, even heroes like Carol Danvers can find themselves struggling with the emotional hurt that comes along. Sometimes even Captain Marvel needs a good kick in the pants to get going. And the good friend who isn’t afraid to give it to her.

Captain Marvel #27 provides a splendid mix of humor, emotional moments, and acid farting cat-lizards. Thompson delivers one of the most charming stories of her run in Captain Marvel as several of Carol’s friends, led by Jessica Drew, try to snap her out of her post-breakup depression with varying results. Thompson’s ever-present gift for writing smooth, witty banter is at its finest throughout this book. As Jessica is prepared to drag Carol kicking and screaming back into the light of day, the almost antagonistic friendship the two share excels at being both humorous and heartwarming.

While Carol and Jessica’s banter is a delight as always, the best moments in this book belong to Hazmat and Lauri-Ell. A couple of moments these two share are perfect. The charm and chemistry that Thompson creates between the two have me hoping she will find reasons to have the two interact again soon.

On the art side of Captain Marvel #27, we see an entirely new duo delivering the visuals for this story. Happily, the art builds on the story’s personality splendidly. Lopez’s line captures all the characters in these panels to great effect. Every scowl, laugh and frustrated shout is presented with just the right amount of comic-style exaggeration.

Meanwhile, new colorist Farrell finishes the art with an excellent eye for colors. The palettes utilized throughout this book help elevate the lines with their lovely contrasts. And certain elements of the story, such as the previously mentioned acid farting cat-lizards, really capture the reader’s eye in large part due to the gorgeous colorwork they are augmented with.

Rounding out the story is Cowles lettering. As always, Cowles delivers a clear and effective job with the letters. While the story is laid out excellently, there are a few moments where I wish the letters could have been given a bit more energy to feel more representative of the artist’s visual delivery.

When all is said and done, Captain Marvel #27 delivers a fun read, flavored with some genuine emotion. The final pages of the book take a surprising turn, and I feel like Thompson’s signature brand of quirky character writing is going to have some excellent opportunities to shine in the coming issues.

Captain Marvel #27 is available now wherever comics are sold.


'Captain Marvel,’ Issue #27
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, Captain Marvel #27 delivers a fun read, flavored with some genuine emotion. The final pages of the book take a surprising turn, and I feel like Thompson’s signature brand of quirky character writing is going to have some excellent opportunities to shine in the coming issues.