REVIEW: ‘Mighty Morphin,’ Issue #5

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Mighty Morphin #5

Mighty Morphin #5 is published by BOOM! Studios, written by Ryan Parrott, illustrated by Marco Renna, colored by Walter Baiamonte (with assistance by Katia Ranalli and Sara Antonellini), and lettered by Ed Dukeshire. The issue winds back the clock and delves into how the Promethea organization recruited Matthew Cook to become the new Green Ranger, leading up to the finale of Mighty Morphin #4.

Fans had guessed that either Matt or the malevolent Lord Drakkon would take up the Green Ranger’s mantle (and personally, I’m glad it’s Matt because Drakkon works far better as an antagonist/unwilling ally in sister title Power Rangers). Matt was an integral supporting character in Go Go Power Rangers, even having a relationship with Kimberly. Parrott, having written Go Go Power Rangers, continues to flesh out Matt and showcases how he’s different from the other Power Rangers. Matt doesn’t really know how to fight, and he feels uncomfortable in the suit. Still, throughout the course of the issue, he grows into the role, even deciding to reveal his identity to serve as a beacon of hope to the citizens of Angel Grove. There’s even a touching moment between him and Kimberly, which may hint at a potential rekindling of their romance or, at the very least, a friendship.

Since Matt is a different Power Ranger from Kimberly and her friends, Promethea and its head, Grace Sterling, are radically different from Ranger mentor Zordon. Grace was originally the Red Ranger under Zordon (as revealed during Kyle Higgins’ run on Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers). Parrott writes her as a morally grey, driven character in a vein similar to Nick Fury or Amanda Waller. She wants to protect the Earth and has good intentions in making Matt a Power Ranger, but as the saying goes: the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

In the pantheon of Power Ranger artists, Renna has been a standout, and this issue is a key example of why. He draws a unique transformation sequence for Matt, with emerald energy wrapping around him and transforming him into the Green Ranger. I also love Renna’s design for the new Green Ranger, which features more detailed gloves and boots and golden accents for the helmet. Renna also gives a sleeker, sharper design to the Dragon Dagger (which comes with an in-story explanation). Baiamonte makes green the prominent color in the issue, whether it’s in Matt’s caption boxes or Grace’s clothing. Green even outlines Dukeshire’s lettering, including  the Dragonzord’s roar when it first emerges from the sea.

Perhaps the best piece of art involves the Dragonzord. Renna draws it rising from the ocean in homage to Godzilla, a massive mountain of silver, black, and green. It’s a rather impressive sight, and Matt has the proper reaction to a gigantic dragon-shaped machine emerging from the ocean and a fun reaction to learning he gets to drive it.

Mighty Morphin #5 provides an excellent origin story for the new Green Ranger, showcasing how Matt Cook is similar and different from his fellow Rangers. Given the other Rangers’ friendship with Matt—and his complicated relationship with Kimberly—I hope that the next issue touches on their reactions to his identity reveal.

Mighty Morphin #5 is available wherever comics are sold.

Mighty Morphin #5
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TL;DR

Mighty Morphin #5 provides an excellent origin story for the new Green Ranger, showcasing how Matt Cook is similar and different from his fellow Rangers. Given the other Rangers’ friendship with Matt—and his complicated relationship with Kimberly—I hope that the next issue touches on their reactions to his identity reveal.