REVIEW: ‘Daredevil,’ Issue #28

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Daredevil #28

Daredevil #28 is published by Marvel Comics. Written by Chip Zdarsky. Art by Marco Checchetto. Colors by Marcio Menyz. Letters by Clayton Cowles. Daredevil is in prison, pleading guilty for the manslaughter of a robber in the first issue of the run. Whilst Matt Murdock is behind bars, Elektra becomes Daredevil in his stead, saving his city for him. In the last two issues, Hell’s Kitchen became under attack by Symbiotes. Daredevil shed his parasitic host, bounding himself to an electric chair to do so. Elektra protected a young girl from attackers but couldn’t prevent the death of the girl’s mother. 

In this issue, more of Daredevil’s life inside prison is revealed. Other inmates still avoid him, and those that go near him are treated with disdain by those around them. Kristen visits him before he is forced into a therapy session with the prison doctor. In Hell’s Kitchen, Elektra and the girl try to come to terms with her mother’s death. And Kingpin pays Typhoid Mary, who is reeling from bonding with one of the symbiote monsters.

While much of this issue is about recuperation, it allows parts of the plot that had taken a backseat due to the King in Black tie-in to power forward. It is still split into three stories, focusing on the pivotal characters of the series. The length of Zdarsky’s run allows for each story to move alongside each other at different paces. It may initially feel like this Daredevil run moves very slowly, but a lot is crammed into these issues. The storyline within the prison is gripping, particularly as Daredevil’s stay there is extended. The issue is bookended nicely with the same scene at the beginning and end, but the last one has a shocking cliffhanger.

There is a subplot involving Daredevil and another character that may be one of the more profound parts of the series thus far.

For the other characters, Daredevil #28 is static. But that provides Zdarsky with the potential for character development. Something admirable about the writer is that he shows characters grappling with their emotions, struggling over multiple issues at times. Elektra’s compassion has its limits. How she interacts with Alice, the girl whose foster mother died, is a fascinating insight into her personality and how it contrasts with Murdock’s. She is entirely sympathetic, but she has no time for pity. Daredevil is a lawyer trained in the art of emotions. Elektra is a warrior who pushes those around her away.

This is an important issue for both Kingpin and Typhoid Mary as well. Kingpin’s machinations have been understated and quiet for many issues now, but they start to come to fruition by this comic’s climax. Kingpin’s pride has been hurt; he feels as if he has failed Hell’s Kitchen. This makes him unpredictable and uncharacteristically vulnerable. Like Elektra, he struggles when Typhoid Mary tries to open up to him.

Within the story and the dialogue, Daredevil #28 has serious and adult discussions. Kirsten and Doctor Hayes (the doctor) talk to Matt about what he is doing in prison. Both are critical of his actions and motivations. Because he chose to enter prison, a much different experience than being forced into that life. The conversation also brings up important real-world issues regarding prisons and those within them, which Zdarsky has clearly researched before writing. This shows that a story such as this can tell much more than just the surface-level plot.

Every main character and most of the supporting figures have high intellects. Daredevil, Elektra, Doc Hayes, Kirstin, Kingpin, Mary, some of the prisoners all have voices that allow for a high vocabulary. The dialogue is rich with emotion and personality, full of darkness and eloquence. 

Checchetto’s art is absolutely exquisite again. Every character is rife with detail, with different body shapes and tattoos, and costumes. Elektra’s hair is gorgeous, huge, and expressive. During a fight in prison, each person involved in the fight is given a unique design. The fight itself is close quarters and claustrophobic, expertly choreographed. Clothes actually look like they are being worn. So much of Checchetto’s world look real and authentic.

The colors are just as stunning as the art, and they complement each other perfectly. While much of the lighting is “natural,” created by whatever is in the room itself, there are important moments with a green or red background. The orange prison uniforms are monotonous, but that is intentional. Each room, each location, has its own atmosphere with different lighting and shades created by it. 

The lettering is sublime. There is a lot of dialogue and many people talking, but Cowles lays out the word balloons and caption boxes brilliantly. 

Daredevil #28 is another amazing issue. Combining important social commentary with an investing storyline, Zdarsky and the art team return to their regular plot with ease. At the same time, the consequences of King in Black are heavy and preserving. This is a beautiful character-based comic, focusing heavily on the figures that are driving the story forward. Twinned with the revelations and action, this comic is an emotional rollercoaster.

Daredevil #28 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Daredevil #28
5

TL;DR

Daredevil #28 is another amazing issue. Combining important social commentary with an investing storyline, Zdarsky and the art team return to their regular plot with ease. At the same time, the consequences of King in Black are heavy and preserving. This is a beautiful character-based comic, focusing heavily on the figures that are driving the story forward. Twinned with the revelations and action, this comic is an emotional rollercoaster.