REVIEW: ‘Amazing Spider-Man,’ Issue #61

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Amazing Spider-Man #61
Amazing Spider-Man #61
is written by Nick Spencer, illustrated by Patrick Gleason, colored by Edgar Delgado, and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna. It is published by Marvel Comics. After coming to terms with the events of “Last Remains” and talking out his feelings with his girlfriend Mary Jane Watson, Peter Parker takes up a new job-and finds himself with a new Spider-Man costume. Meanwhile, the Kingpin sends a horde of criminals after Peter’s roommate Fred Meyers-aka Boomerang-and their alien pet Gog.

From the very beginning, this issue is a fast-paced yet still engaging story that sets up a new status quo for Spidey. The opening two pages make that clear, recapping the events of “Last Remains” and showing Spidey leaping into action against his lower tier foes, including Speed Demon and Hydro-Man. After how dark and heavy “Last Remains” got, it’s nice to have a lighter story-and; it’s a testament to how versatile Spidey is as a character that he can occupy both light and dark stories.

Spidey’s new costume sparked a wave of controversy when it was first announced, and I was on the fence when I first saw it. However, it looks terrific under Gleason’s artwork: the combination of silver, gold, and blue is really eye-popping and lends a Tokusatsu-Esque flair to Spidey’s combat moves. Seeing Spidey leap around in his new suit and battling villains is a delight to watch. Delgado also makes the scenery pop by coloring it a bright green, which provides a perfect contrast to Spidey’s new suit. A key example features Spidey slamming his fist into Hydro-Man’s jaw, energy flying from his glove. I’ve praised Gleason’s art in the past, but he draws an amazing Spider-Man (pun completely intended.)

However, I’m not too sold on Spidey’s new job-mainly because it feels like a rehash of his job at the Daily Bugle (albeit with a successful pay bump.) The idea of Peter Parker taking pictures to pay his rent is a classic Spidey trope. Still, I personally prefer the science-oriented jobs he’s had-particularly when he was a teacher. It showed a sign of growth, and hopefully, there’s more to this new job than touching on the ‘greatest hits’ of Spidey’s history. (To Spencer’s credit, this does reunite Peter with former boss J. Jonah Jameson who gets some of the best comedic bits in the issue.)

On the other hand, Spencer manages to effortlessly weave together story threads for upcoming issues while dealing with the fallout from “Last Remains.” The Kingpin’s quest for a certain artifact is touched upon, Boomerang’s new hero status is touched upon, even Gog is touched upon. Those who have been following Spencer’s run will appreciate those threads being touched upon, especially Boomerang. Spencer is no stranger to the character. Having written him in the Superior Foes of Spider-Man limited series and his sleazy, opportunistic personality serves as the perfect foil to Peter Parker’s “with great power comes great responsibility” stance.

Amazing Spider-Man #61 acts as a “new start” for the web-slinger, giving him a new costume and new job-and setting up a new wave of threats. Given where the issue leaves off, Spidey and Boomerang are up a creek without a paddle-and that often leads to some of the best Peter Parker stories.

Amazing Spider-Man #61 is available wherever comics are sold.

 

 

Amazing Spider-Man #61
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TL;DR

Amazing Spider-Man #61 acts as a “new start” for the web-slinger, giving him a new costume and new job-and setting up a new wave of threats. Given where the issue leaves off, Spidey and Boomerang are up a creek without a paddle-and that often leads to some of the best Peter Parker stories.