G2A.Com Launches Free Training To Teachers

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G2A.com

G2A.com  has announced the findings of a recent survey – run by independent research company Censuswide – which reveals that more teachers are turning to video games to engage and educate students. With many classrooms shut and school trips canceled, 48% of educators across the UK and US say they have increasingly looked to gaming to boost interaction in their lessons.

According to survey results, 91% of teachers who currently use gaming as an educational tool say it has helped them better engage with students – with games now being used across various subjects, from maths to physics to literature. Some key findings include:

  • 77% of UK and US teachers say that the introduction of virtual learning has changed education forever
  • 76% of teachers are concerned about the way they can engage students in a remote environment
  • 89% of teachers say using gaming in class has already been beneficial for student’s engagement with subjects
  • 47% of those who don’t currently use gaming as an educational tool would like to try this method
  • 50% don’t currently use gaming as an educational tool because they don’t know how to
  • 62% of them claim they would feel more comfortable doing so if they received formal training
  • 69% of teachers believe their students would be more likely to do their homework if gaming was involved
  • 68% of teachers believe that gaming will have an important role as a resource in the future of education

The findings come as G2A.com today launches its new teacher-training course – G2A Academy: Video Games in Education – on Udemy, the world’s largest platform for learning and teaching online. The course is divided into three sections that unpack the techniques teachers can use to introduce gaming into their classes effectively.

G2A Academy was authored by Dr. Szymon Makuch and Dr. Adam Flamma, two up-and-coming gaming academics currently teaching at the University of Lower Silesia in Wrocław, Poland. Accompanying each unit, they have developed a series of sample exercises and interactive materials– with examples, gaming titles that can be used – to assist the teacher on their gaming journey. The full course is free-to-access for all teachers. Any teacher that would like to access the course simply has to visit the site and follow the instructions. Any non-teachers wishing to access the course will have to pay a fee, with G2A donating all profits to digital exclusion charities.

G2A Academy is available in English, with subtitled versions in more languages coming soon.