REVIEW: ‘Two Moons,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Two Moons #1

Two Moons #1 is published by Image Comics, written by John Arcudi, art by Valerio Giangiordano, colors by Dave Stewart, and letters by Michael Hensley. Meet Virgil; he is a soldier in the Union Army serving in the war against the Confederacy. There is something about Virgil that makes him stand out among his fellow troopers. He’s Pawnee. And while he isn’t close to his heritage, it is still a part of him as he is about to be reminded.

As a Christian raised white male, I cannot help but feel a little cautious when approaching a review for a story that has a strong focus on the theme of Indigenous peoples’ mysticism. While nothing in this story feels like it is done in any hurtful or exploitive way, I am obviously the last person qualified to judge such things. So I’m not going to. My review of Two Moons #1 and its parts will be based solely on the writing style, plot, and art and leave the more important critiques to those capable of making them. Now, let’s talk about the book.

Two Moons #1 is, in every way, the quintessential introductory comic. It lays the groundwork for its numerous themes and manages to keep the reader interested throughout the process. From our first introduction to Virgil to the final page’s closing image, there is always something that is both new and interesting presented to the reader.

Our story follows its lead, Virgil, over the course of a day. When we first meet him, he is sleeping in his tent as some form of ethereal being approaches him. Just as the creature reaches out his hand for him, Virgil shoots upright and realizes that he was asleep.

Once the cobwebs are shaken loose, Virgil and another soldier are tasked with going into town to acquire fresh medical supplies. While at the hospital, Virgil is approached by an indigenous man he identifies as his grandfather. After receiving a cryptic message from him, a nurse approaches, and the man he was speaking to moments before is clearly dead on a nearby bed and has been for some time by the nurse’s reckoning. Thoroughly unsettled, Virgil is more than ready to head back to camp. Though once there, they discover that some unexpected guests have arrived to start a ruckus.

Writer Arcudidoes a great job utilizing the various moments throughout Two Moons #1 to establish strong personalities for his cast. However, his best work has to be Virgil. This character comes across as everything you want a sympathetic protagonist to be. Down to earth, good-natured, and pleasant. He seems like someone that you could meet anywhere and quite possibly have. This makes the characters instantly familiar to the reader.

The art in Two Moons #1 delivers the grittiness and emotion in its story well. The era of time feels well represented, and the heavy line work creates a sense of foreboding that the story leans into heavily by its final pages. This darker tone is further emphasized by the colors, which utilize an overall darker palette to keep the energy and outlook of the story lower. Lastly, we have the lettering. The letters here deliver the story to the reader in a clear and easy-to-follow way.

When taken all together, Two Moons #1 delivers an interesting character-filled introduction to its narrative. The story picks up in the final act and leaves Virgil in a tight spot. I expect many readers will want to see what comes of it.

Two Moons #1 is available on February 24th, wherever comics are sold.

Two Moons #1
4

TL;DR

When taken all together, Two Moons #1 delivers an interesting character-filled introduction to its narrative. The story picks up in the final act and leaves Virgil in a tight spot. I expect many readers will want to see what comes of it.