REVIEW: ‘Amazing Spider-Man,’ Issue #60

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Amazing Spiderman #60

Amazing Spider-Man #60 is written by Nick Spencer, penciled by Mark Bagley, inked by John Dell and Andrew Hennessy, colored by Rachelle Rosenberg, and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna. It is published by Marvel Comics. “No Exit” finds Peter Parker, still struggling from the trauma he went through in “Last Remains,” discussing his thoughts with Mary Jane Watson. MJ has Peter go to an abandoned theater where he bares his soul in an attempt to start healing. Meanwhile, Doctor Strange confronts a being when he learns there is something wrong with Peter.

Though this issue is relatively light on action, it is a chance for Peter to face the trauma and his repressed guilt over the events of “Last Remains.” Spencer essentially has Peter bare his soul to the reader as he discusses the losses he’s endured as Spider-Man–specifically, his Uncle Ben. And although Kindred put him through hell physically and mentally, Peter still wants to save his friend. That, to me, is the defining character trait for Spider-Man: he always wants to help people, no matter what. And that desire is complicated by his history with Harry Osborn, as well as Harry’s hatred of him.

Spencer also underlines the importance of Mary Jane to Peter’s relationship. It’s MJ’s idea for Peter to talk out his feelings, and she tells him that she is with him no matter what. I’ve loved their relationship because it feels like a real relationship should; both partners have each others’ backs through the good times and the bad. Spencer has made Peter and MJ’s relationship the core focus of his book. With the jaw-dropping revelation at the issue’s end, it becomes even clearer that he intends to tackle one of the most controversial stories in Spider-Man’s history, which also dealt with said relationship.

The art team brings Spencer’s script to life in stunning detail, with Bagley once again proving that he’s one of the best Spider-Man artists in the business. As he did with Amazing Spider-Man #56, Bagley favors close-ups of Peter as his emotional state transitions, from pensiveness to grief to rage. Another image features Peter and MJ embracing one another deeply. There are no words on that page, yet it’s filled with emotion.

Rounding out the artistic team is Rosenberg on colors. Rosenberg makes great use of the shadows and lights, placing Peter under a massive spotlight-which is fitting, given that he’s the center of the stage. I also appreciate that she continues the trend of placing Peter in red and blue clothing to match the colors of his Spider-Man suit.

Amazing Spider-Man #60 essentially acts as a one-act play, letting Peter Parker bare his soul while laying down the next step in Nick Spencer’s master plan. The next issue offers a new costume for Spider-Man and a new job, and I hope that both continue to steer Peter back to where he was when writer J. Michael Straczynski was writing Amazing Spider-Man.

Amazing Spider-Man #60 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

 

Amazing Spider-Man #60
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TL;DR

Amazing Spider-Man #60 essentially acts as a one-act play, letting Peter Parker bare his soul while laying down the next step in Nick Spencer’s master plan. The next issue offers a new costume for Spider-Man and a new job, and I hope that both continue to steer Peter back to where he was when writer J. Michael Straczynski was writing Amazing Spider-Man.