REVIEW: ‘S.W.O.R.D.,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

S.W.O.R.D. #3

S.W.O.R.D. #3 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Al Ewing, art by Valerio Schiti, Ray-Anthony Height, Bernard Chang, and Nico Leon, colors by Marte Gracia, with letters by Ariana Maher. SWORD HQ is cut off from Earth. With no communications in or out, Brand and the rest of the station’s personnel are cut off from Krakoa. But just because they can’t talk to Earth doesn’t mean they don’t have work to do.

King in Black’s landing, when it did, made for some interesting interactions with S.W.O.R.D. While other comics like Spider-Woman have worked to integrate the company-wide crossover into its current narrative, due to how early in S.W.O.R.D.’s run this is taking place, it feels like Ewing is doing everything he can to sidestep the event altogether. Rather than spend this issue focusing on the team sent to Earth, like in the last issue, Ewing takes readers on a journey everywhere else.

S.W.O.R.D. #3 follows chief logistics officer Eden Fesi as he uses his unique transportation methods to hop around a few places. While some of these stops are personal, others are business as readers are given a chance to meet and better know this piece of the S.W.O.R.D. puzzle. And the incredible power he wields.

The first stop on our journeys with Eden is to visit his family in Australia. What with the black case encompassing the world, who wouldn’t want to check up on family if they could? This scene does a great job of fully introducing readers to this character. As this is the first time I’ve seen him in a comic, the moment was thoroughly enlightening. Ewing portrays this individual as a complex, multilayered character who seems to harbor numerous uncertainties. This blend makes me incredibly intrigued to see where this character’s story will lead him.

Having seen that no symbiotic dragons had consumed his family, Eden’s next stop takes him on some deep space business. The aliens he deals with and exactly what he is offering are both kept a bit vague. If what was being offered here is exactly what I think it was, something rather shady is going on. Though the real question would be, on whose authority is the deal being made? Brand’s or the Councils. As Brand showed in the last issue, she is more than willing to go behind the council’s back when it suits her—another plotline left to unravel.

There are a couple more stops on Eden’s journey, but I won’t spoil to where or what our wanderer learns at these destinations. Suffice it to say, they herald big, if not overly surprising, information.

The art in S.W.O.R.D. #3 keeps pace with the rapidly changing environments that its story utilizes nicely. The art team gives each locale its look, keeping each strikingly different from the last. This coupled with Gracia’s gorgeous colors keeps the visual presentation here from wanting for nothing.

Lastly, we have Maher’s lettering. The letter work here delivers its story in a clear and presentable fashion. Leaving the reader with no trouble following along with the plot.

When all is said and done, S.W.O.R.D. #3 delivers a story that utilizes its time building one of its characters and setting up plot threads for future issues. It will be interesting to see where the next issue takes the story.

S.W.O.R.D. #3 is available on February 10th, wherever comics are sold.

S.W.O.R.D. #3
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, S.W.O.R.D. #3 delivers a story that utilizes its time building one of its characters and setting up plot threads for future issues. It will be interesting to see where the next issue takes the story.