REVIEW: ‘Daredevil,’ Issue #27

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Daredevil #27 - But Why Tho?Daredevil #27 is published by Marvel Comics and is the second part of a tie-in to the King in Black event. Written by Chip Zdarsky with art by Marco Checchetto and Mike Hawthorne. Inks are by Adriano Di Benedetto and Checchetto. Marcio Menyz is on colours and Clayton Cowles is the letterer.

Matt Murdock is in prison—punishment for accidentally killing a robber in the first issue. In his stead, Elektra has become Daredevil and protects Hell’s Kitchen. The God of Symbiotes Knull and his army have landed on Earth, with his flying minions descending on New York. Elektra finds herself protecting a young girl from her own mother, possessed by a symbiote. Kingpin witnesses Typhoid Mary get overwhelmed, while Daredevil faces the attackers in his prison uniform. But Matt is unable to stop the aliens from taking over his body.

In the second part, Elektra faces down two Symbiotes as Typhoid Mary joins the attack. Without many options, Elektra prioritizes the safety of the girl over herself. In prison, Daredevil struggles against the influence of Knull, using his newfound abilities to fight the other invaders. But the God of Symbiotes isn’t relinquishing his control that easily. And safe in his panic room, Kingpin contemplates his options.

The pace of the plot is as quick and exciting as the first part. The structure also remains the same. The comic bounces between the three characters dealing with the situation in their respective locations. Much of the issue is fights and action. Zdarsky scripts the fights well, allowing the heroes chances to hurt their extremely powerful foes while also constantly reminding the reader that both of them are out of their depth. There are numerous shocking plot points that will surely have consequences on the characters coming out of the tie-in.

Both Daredevils are put to the test in this issue. Elektra is fantastic, put to the test against super-villains for the first time since donning the red cowl. What is clear is that she puts innocents before her own safety, the true markings of a hero. The girl is Elektra’s priority at all times, using herself as a decoy to draw Typhoid Mary and the child’s mother away. The other important part of her character that Zdarsky frequently utilizes is her brilliant strategic mind. Whilst she doesn’t have the knowledge of how to fight Symbiotes that Matt and the other heroes do, that doesn’t stop her from devising tactics to distract or slow them down. What happens to her in this issue is sure to rear its head again within the series.

The other Daredevil in Daredevil #27 is struggling just as much as the one in Hell’s Kitchen. Matt battles the influence of Knull and the symbiotes inside the prison. He adapts quickly to the new abilities at his disposal. The one small disappointment is that it may have been interesting to see how the change affected his own senses, but there was little mention regarding that. To some, it may seem like a stretch that Daredevil is able to resist the brainwashing that comes with the parasitic invasion. But it is known that Matt Murdock has an indomitable will and is one of the most stubborn characters in the Marvel Universe. Some of the choices he makes are surprising and examples of how self-destructive he can be. Similarly to Elektra, there will be ramifications after this tie-in.

As for Kingpin, he has had a supporting role within the tie-in so far, and hasn’t been seen in general since Elektra changed into a different red costume. But it is evident within his scenes that he does care for the city he is the mayor of. He didn’t heed Iron Man’s urging to evacuate New York, and the people are suffering for it now. He also feels concerned about Typhoid Mary, who saved him last issue. This shows that Wilson Fisk became mayor to actually achieve something beyond inflating his own ego.

The art is amazing by both Hawthorne and Checchetto. The fight scenes are well choreographed and the artists appear to have had fun redesigning the possessed characters. What is nice about the changes is that they are both impressive and scary without being over the top. Daredevil’s gained large devil horns while Checchetto seems to give Typhoid Mary’s incredibly detailed hair life of its own. Daredevil’s lean shape has remained but both gain spiked shoulder pads to make them perfect KISS backup singers. The inks by Di Benedetto shows off his muscle definition that was masked previously by his prison uniform. 

The fight scenes are full of energy and clever movement as martial arts meets alien powers, yet both artists make use of their very individualistic styles to make each fight feel unique. Hawthorne drawing Murdock makes the combat feel like a brawl or a slugfest against two much larger opponents. Meanwhile, Checchetto captures Elektra like a dancer, full of grace and elegance.

The colours are stunning. Menyz ensures that the only red on the panels is from the two Daredevils. The transition between art styles is seamless, yet Menyz accentuates both superbly. Similar colours are used, like oranges and dark blues, but they feel so different. 

The word balloons and much of the captions are small, yet easy to read. This provides more space for the action on the page. In contrast, the telepathic communication Knull gives to those attached to the Symbiotes is much bigger, like they are seeking to take control.

Daredevil #27 is an enthralling, action-packed second part to the tie-in. Zdarsky has successfully managed to combine the plot of his run with the event to the benefit of both. It has allowed for some important character development with some plot threads that are sure to be continued. There is a strong emotional core to the issue and the artists express themselves with new and fun designs. 

Daredevil #27 is available where comics are sold.


Daredevil #27
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TL;DR

Daredevil #27 is an enthralling, action-packed second part to the tie-in. Zdarsky has successfully managed to combine the plot of his run with the event to the benefit of both. It has allowed for some important character development with some plot threads that are sure to be continued. There is a strong emotional core to the issue and the artists express themselves with new and fun designs.