REVIEW: ‘Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 is published by DC Comics, written by Marguerite Bennet, art by Marguerite Sauvage, and letters by Wes Abbott. With some of Lynari’s family come to claim the Starfall Jewel, Kara must prepare herself to return to a road she had long ago forsaken. But even if she is willing to turn herself once more into a weapon of violence, will it prove enough to stop her foes?

Generally speaking, the first expectation of a comic is that it will entertain. That it will provide an enjoyable story that excites and amuses us. A small escape into an often black and white world, so much simpler than the gray-colored reality we live in. And yet, the great stories that are most remembered are those that step beyond the panel to panel excitement to try to say something more. Something meaningful and full of purpose. Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 takes this extra step. And the narrative is all the better for it.

Just as with the last issue, this story centers its narrative around the concept of legacy. Of the legacy we build, as well as the legacy others perceive. With Kara once more being called to fight, it appears her legacy of quiet peace and support is about to be shattered. But an innocent life hangs in the balance. And she is still one who wears the S.

How Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 resolves its primary conflict is a surprising twist in how I foresaw the event playing out.  Writer Bennet keeps to the primary themes that were established in the last issue, keeping the book’s focus on its meaning, rather than let an overabundance of action dilute this focus.

Once the conflict resolves, we are given what feels like the only reasonable ending to a story that choices to focus so strongly on the theme of legacy. Of course, that is a glimpse into the legacy that is left behind by Kara; as far as legacies go, it’s a good one.

While the choices of Kara and the ramifications they have are the main thrust of Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2, there is also an interesting look at perception and truth through the perspective of the story’s antagonists. The version of events back on their homeworld that these individuals cling to feels bizarre in its rationale. Whether or not they truly believe the logic they spout, or simply cling to it in a vain attempt to justify their actions is an interesting thought. Given some of the leaps in logic I’ve seen people in real life make to justify themselves, I can’t discount either possibility.

The art presents its story to help further keep the narrative’s focus where it needs to be. While the combat panels are well executed, they never feel quite right. That’s not to say that there is anything wrong with them, but rather the presence of violence in the world that Kara has carved out for herself simply doesn’t feel right. Though, at the peak of the confrontation artist Sauvage delivers a full-page panel of Kara, revealed at the height of her power. While it retains the sense of wrongness for the character, it is an impressive sight to behold.

Rounding out the book’s presentation is Abbott’s lettering. The letter work here delivers a clear and easy to follow story, while also giving some extra voice to some of the characters and moments with strong use of bold fonts, and alternative letter designs.

When all is said and done, Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 brings its story to an excellent conclusion. Kara’s journey, what she teaches, and what she learns along the way is a filling and meaningful tale.

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 Is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #2 brings its story to an excellent conclusion. Kara’s journey, what she teaches, and what she learns along the way is a filling and meaningful tale.