REVIEW: ‘Star Wars Adventures,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Star Wars Adventures #3 - But Why Tho?

Star Wars Adventures #3 from IDW Publishing is a two-story comic. The first story, “Life Day,” is written by Michael Moreci, illustrated by Megan Levens, colored by Charlie Kirchoff, and lettered by Jake M. Wood. The second story, “The Hostage” is written by Shane McCarthy with art by the same team.

In the first story, “Life Day,” Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jin are visiting Wookiee friends on Kashyyyk for Life Day. However, the festivities are truncated when a band of Trandoshan hunters attacks and captures many Wookiees, as well as Qui-Gon. Obi-Wan and Brennonn, Qui-Gon’s old friend, have to save the day. This story is another in a long list of excellent portrayals of the relationship between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan. Their conversation about Life Day, the Force, and their place in it all is great, even in its brevity.

I absolutely love the coloring in this story. Kashyyyk, especially its sky, is utterly gorgeous. I also really like the way that Levens stylized the Wookiees and the Trandoshans here. The Wookiees all have clear and distinct personal styles with their hair and clothes, and the Trandoshans have definitions of their bodies, which they sometimes lack in other depictions. I’m not sure if I would have preferred to get the whole story at once and had two villain stories in the next issue rather than only half of this already short story, but it certainly left me ready for the rest either way.

The second story, “The Hostage” starts off in a very familiar way for Maul. He’s in chains, for a change. The story takes place during the Clone Wars prior to Maul’s ascension to the Mandalorian throne. He’s been captured by a crime family whom he had hoped would join his growing galactic crime syndicate. Fortunately, his brother Savage Opress is just outside with basically an army working to help break him out. The story is pithy, and Maul’s wit, might, and sharp tongue are on full display. It’s a bit confusing in its cold open. I thought I had missed something from a previous issue at first. But by the end, the cold open is more appreciable. I don’t totally love that so many Maul stories are about him getting captured and breaking out, but this one is still enjoyable nonetheless.

Maul’s upper half is drawn great in Star Wars Adventures #3, but his lower, mechanical half feels maybe just a touch off in one particular full-page image. His feet are just really big and the proportions seem off. Otherwise, the art is very simple in this story. The scenery is just a big empty room, but there are several really well-colored lighting effects from windows and doorways worth taking note of. The lettering in both stories is a little bit tight in the small speech bubbles, but generally still entirely readable.

Star Wars Adventures #3 offers two short stories: one of some heroes who don’t get enough action, and one of a villain who is constantly in the same predicament. The stories are both quite enjoyable and very pithy, with especially excellent art in the first story.

Star Wars Adventures #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Star Wars Adventures #3
4.5

TL;DR

Star Wars Adventures #3 offers two short stories: one of some heroes who don’t get enough action, and one of a villain who is constantly in the same predicament. The stories are both quite enjoyable and very pithy, with especially excellent art in the first story.