REVIEW: ‘Luna,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Luna #1

Content Warning: Luna #1 contains a scene of sexual assault

Luna #1 is published by BOOM! Studios and is written, drawn, and lettered by Maria Llovet. While traveling through the desert, Teresa is the victim of a car accident that leaves her stranded and injured by the side of the road. Things look bad until she is found by The Family of the Sun. What appears to be a sort of small commune focused on free expression and free love. But, when Teresa starts receiving strange visions, it seems the Family of the Sun may be about more than casting off the shackles of modern social conventions.

Does true love exist? The kind of love that can endure any hardship, struggle, trial, or tribulation? It is quite likely that at some point in each of our lives, we have thought yes, and at some other point known it was no. Just as we have each most likely at some point wanted nothing more than to possess this style of love. The thought of unwavering, constant support in this life full of uncertainty and negativity is a potent promise. A promise that is hinted at in Luna #1. However, there may be some strings attached.

When Teresa wakens after her car accident, she finds herself in a strange place, greeted by a strange person. She quickly learns that she is with the Family of the Sun. And, at least for the moment, it’s where she’ll have to remain until their supply truck comes back. But in the meantime, Teresa is extended every hospitality the commune can offer.

Soon Teresa is being given the tour of this dreamy little oasis in the desert. And at first glance, it feels like a true paradise. Ease and happiness seem to be the order of the day. Teresa is clearly taken with the air of the place. Soon she seems to be deeply considering staying in this haven devoted to a love that conquers all. But, Teresa begins to see things while wandering the commune. Things that are alarming and strange. What could be causing these things, and how are they related to the Family of the Sun?

Llovet’s writing throughout Luna #1 brings a unique mix to its tale. The overwhelming feeling of laid back, free love energy that the book presents is given just enough of an odd chill to set the reader on edge. This chill comes to a head in the book’s closing scene, where some things happen that, while perhaps are a bit of a spoiler, I feel need to be talked about.

As night comes to the commune, a fire is roaring, and everyone gathers for some laughs, food, and weed. There is music, dancing, and a general vibe that all is laid back and well. When Teresa’s eyes connect with the commune’s leader Lux, they soon separate from the group to have a heart to heart that soon finds them heading back to his room.

Once there, Luna #1 initially continues in the direction one would probably expect. But as both parties begin to disrobe, Lux gives Teresa something that has some extremely potent effects on the young woman. Seemingly rendering her incapable of resistance, the night takes a couple not so obvious turns as Lux indoctrinates her into his little family.  While I won’t give the details of what happens, as some elements affect the burgeoning plot, I felt that the scene’s presence needed mentioning for any who may find the moment uncomfortable.

Llovet’s art in this book delivers its narrative well. The character’s and energy of each scene is presented with skill. And while this is true overall, where she really nails the imagery is in the more esoteric moments. When a vision strikes Teresa, or when the fireside fun is going on, the eclectic visuals Llovet employees capture the mind-altering moments with all the strangeness one could ask for.

When all is said and done, Luna #1 delivers a curious start to its story. It delivers enough hints at what may be happening so readers will not feel lost while maintaining the air of mystery the book clearly wants to have. With the story closing on a fairly disturbing note, the book leaves readers with a harshly contrasting feeling to what it presents for most of its duration. Making this ending something striking.

Luna #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Luna #1
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, Luna #1 delivers a curious start to its story. It delivers enough hints at what may be happening so readers will not feel lost while maintaining the air of mystery the book clearly wants to have. With the story closing on a fairly disturbing note, the book leaves readers with a harshly contrasting feeling to what it presents for most of its duration. Making this ending something striking.