REVIEW: ‘Mama Akuma,’ Volume 1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Mama Akuma Volume 1

Mama Akuma Volume 1 is written and illustrated by mangaka Kuzushiro. The series is published by Yen Press and localized in English by translator Abby Lehrke, with lettering by Bianca Pistillo. When Yen Press first announced that they had acquired the license for Mama Akuma, I was beyond excited. A wholesome manga about a demon summoned to become a mama? Sign me up.

In Mama Akuma Volume 1, Seere is a demon who, for centuries, has prided himself on his work—fulfilling the wishes of those with whom he forms contracts. Whether it’s slaughtering their enemies or obtaining wealth beyond measure, anything is possible with his powerful magic and he’s more than happy to deliver. But Seere’s latest summoner, Sakura Masuda, is unlike any he’s dealt with before. For starters, she’s a fourth-grader living with her middle-school-age brother. But the big twist is that the little girl doesn’t have a request for world domination. Instead, she just really wants Seere to be her mama.

Now, it’s important to note that Sakura isn’t looking for Akuma to become the spitting image of her mother. Nope. That would be, in her words, “blasphemy.” Instead, Seere is supposed to do all the things that Sakura thinks mamas should do. Do the laundry—without using magic, of course—carry dinner to the table, and of course, love their children. The heart of Mama Akuma is taking a traditional-looking demon straight from any manga and throwing him into an environment where he shows his softest side with the same enthusiasm he had while wreaking havoc.

It’s this last point that makes Mama Akuma a standout. Kuzushiro uses Seere’s intense personality against his domestic duties to build both humor and emotion in the volume. Over the course of nine chapters, this volume showcases the importance of finding family, but also in processing your grief. The choice to make Sakura draw a clear distinction between her mother who passed away and the mama that she wants Seere to be was a good one. This creates a boundary that allows Sakura to ask for what her brother and her need while still acknowledging that no one can truly replace her mom.

That said, while the wholesome story is great, Kuzushiro’s art is also fantastic, taking the narrative to the next level. The balance of Seere’s personality against his situation is mirrored in his design and the world he’s inhabiting on behalf of Sakura. It’s all wholesome and every interaction between Seere and Sakura shows a softness that evolved over the course of their relationship, which is directly shown with Seere becoming more and more human looking.

Overall, Mama Akuma Volume 1 is wholeheartedly wholesome. It’s also a joyous read that offers laughs and emotion. If you’re looking for a manga that just hits a happy spot in your heart, this is the one to pick up from Yen Press.

Mama Akuma Volume 1 is available now from wherever books are sold.

Mama Akuma Volume 1
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TL;DR

Overall, Mama Akuma Volume 1 is wholeheartedly wholesome. It’s also a joyous read that offers laughs and emotion. If you’re looking for a manga that just hits a happy spot in your heart, this is the one to pick up from Yen Press.