REVIEW: ‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #25

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Captain Marvel #25

Captain Marvel #25 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Kelly Thompson, art by Lee Garbett and Belén Ortega, colors by Antonio Fabela, and letters by Clayton Cowles. With the truth behind Ove’s New Atlantis revealed, Carol and company find themselves prisoners of this would-be tyrant. As Ove prepares the final steps of his plan, Carol confronts Enchantress about her son, while the rest of her companions rally for one last desperate attempt to save the day.

Among the myriad aspects of this issue’s story, there is a recurring theme within its character-driven tale. That theme is about believing in one’s self. Several characters are required to face down their struggles and step beyond the limitations that have been imposed on them, whether those limits come from without or within. This sort of theming lands perfectly in Thompson’s character-centric style of writing. And she pulls off each instance of it with the skill and panache one would expect of her considerable talents.

As Captain Marvel #25 opens, we see Brigid struggling to break free of her magical bonds. While her efforts prove in vain, she is soon aided by Rhodes. With a little coxing from Brigid, she is able to phase Brigid out of her imprisonment. Rhodes’ reluctance to free her comrade is the first hint of the theme I previously mentioned. As Rhodes heads off to free the others, Brigid heads deeper into Ove’s fortress to find Carol. Knowing that she is the key to this whole situation, she knows the sooner she is found, the better.

While her compatriots busy themselves with their liberation, Carol is confronted by Ove and Enchantress. Through their dialogue, she learns what Ove’s final goal is. The highlight of this informational segment, however, comes when Ove leaves to fetch Magik. Once alone, Carol tries to talk reason into Enchantress in the hopes that she will help them stop her son. Through this sequence, we learn the full history of Ove and how he and Enchantress have come to where they are. Thompson delivers Enchantress’s monologue here with subtly and skill. Enchantress is often a less than a black-and-white villain, and her presence here builds on that complicated history nicely.

When Ove returns to begin fulfilling his plans, some of the newly freed heroes step in to throw a monkey wrench into the proceedings. There are several truly get-hype moments in this final sequence. I won’t spoil what happens, but it suffices it to say that it lays the groundwork for another of this series truly epic confrontations.

While there are numerous levels one can praise the art in Captain Marvel #25, the biggest area I have to speak to is the characters’ designs. While Garbett’s ability to do cool designs comes as no surprise, a couple of moments here raise the already strong showings they’ve provided to new heights.

The color usage throughout this book furthers the strength of the visual presentation. This is especially true during Enchantress’s monologue about the past. The colors employed by Fabela do a great job of bringing artist Ortega’s line work to life.

The final element that brings it all together is Cowles’s smooth work on letters. Placing each piece of dialogue exactly where it needs to be, Cowles’s letters allow the reader an easy journey through this exciting, character filled story.

Looking back on it as a whole, no aspect of Captain Marvel #25 fails to deliver in the slightest. Emotional moments, great characters, and an exciting send-off that sets up the next issue perfectly. The hype is real for this one. And I cannot wait to see how this story ends.

Captain Marvel #25 is available on January 27th, wherever comics are sold.

Captain Marvel #25
5

TL;DR

Looking back on it as a whole, no aspect of Captain Marvel #25 fails to deliver in the slightest. Emotional moments, great characters, and an exciting send-off that sets up the next issue perfectly. The hype is real for this one. And I cannot wait to see how this story ends.