ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Dead End Kids - The Suburban Job #2

Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2, published by Source Point Press, is written by Frank Gogol, illustrated and colored by Nenad Cviticanin, and lettered by Sean Rinehart. In the previous issue, we are introduced to a new set of teens as they deal with the September 11 attacks’ fallout. With the story taking place seven years after the attacks, these former friends struggle with their own issues that came from this horrific event. Brian deals with the loss of someone important to him who died in the war. Des continues to re-play a voicemail from someone who she cares for but doesn’t seem to be around anymore. Amna visits her younger brother in the hospital, who appears to have suffered an attack because of his Middle Eastern background. However, one unfortunate discovery brings them back together to deal with a local drug dealer.

In this new issue, the group is trying to find what to do with the bag of money that they found. They all make a plan to meet somewhere and talk about what’s going to happen with the money. Meanwhile, readers get more information about Ray-Ray, the drug dealer that serves as the series’ antagonist. Readers will get to see his reason behind becoming a criminal and the life that led him to become who he is.

One of the elements that stood out the most from Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2 was the inclusion of narration from a mysterious character. It has yet to be revealed who the narration comes from, but it supports the overall story in many ways. For one, it sets the tone of the characters are feeling and also of the story. So far, the story’s tone is much darker than its predecessor, and the narration capitalizes on that to take it one step further. The narration element makes it seem like all hope is lost, which fits the story’s narrative. It also seems to serve as a way for the narrator to reflect on what has happened. That piece of reflection is valuable, especially with the premise of the series set up in the previous issue.

Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2 puts more focus on Amna and the reason her brother is in the hospital. It was revealed in the previous issue that her brother changed his name from Osama to Sam and that somehow him being in the hospital is her fault. While not much about the situation leading up to Sam being hospitalized has been revealed, it’s clear that it is an emotional toll on Amna. From the looks of things, she’s the one character so far that has the most at stake, which was a surprising turn of events. However, her character is much more authentic, especially with the historical context in which the series occurs. One hope is that more of her character is revealed, and her relationship with her brother is explored deeper.

While reading Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2, I couldn’t help but be distracted by all the constant flashbacks. The flashbacks took up most of the pages in this issue rather than the central focus being on events that take place in the present. Most of the flashbacks gave more info on the central antagonist of the story, which would be great under normal circumstances. However, it jeopardized the character depth that the central protagonists lack. It’s not certain how many more issues this series will have, but nothing so far has made me care deeply about any of the characters in the series. There has to be much more than stating that the characters were affected by the events of September 11th. Showing a much deeper look at the ramifications would lead to a more impactful story.

While I enjoyed the first issue, Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2 left me wanting more. While some of my gripes with the first issue were resolved, the new dilemmas brought up in this issue can’t be ignored. The flashbacks took over most of the issue and didn’t add anything new to the central protagonists. I appreciated the backstory on the series’ antagonist, but having under-development main characters makes the series suffer. While the narration elements in the series and the bit of character progression that Amna was given, these elements weren’t enough to fully get me invested in this series’s second issue.

Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2 will be available wherever comics are sold in 2021.


Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2
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TL;DR

While I enjoyed the first issue, Dead End Kids—The Suburban Job #2 left me wanting more. While some of my gripes with the first issue were resolved, the new dilemmas brought up in this issue can’t be ignored. The flashbacks took over most of the issue and didn’t add anything new to the central protagonists. I appreciated the backstory on the series’ antagonist, but having under-development main characters makes the series suffer. While the narration elements in the series and the bit of character progression that Amna was given, these elements weren’t enough to fully get me invested in this series’s second issue.