REVIEW: ‘Thor’ Issue #11

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Thor Issue #11
Thor
issue #11 is published by Marvel Comics written by Donny Cates, illustrated by Nic Klein, colored by Matt Wilson, and lettered by VC’s Joe Sabino. In a stunning turn of horrific events, Donald Blake is back from the beyond, but this mild-mannered doctor has a vendetta to settle with King Thor.

Previously, Donald Blake had been returned to the land of the living, back from his eternal bliss that was created by Odin. Within that paradise, something had gone terribly wrong as the magic that allowed time and memory to operate differently began to fail once Thor began his reign as King of Asgard. Leveraging the power of Jormungand, and sharing power with Thor himself including the power of the Odin-force, Donald Blake has become one of the strongest beings in the galaxy, as he enacts his terrible revenge on all of the previous Thors, and the people of Asgard.

Now in Thor issue #11, titled “Prey” part three of six, Donald Blake is amongst the citizens of Midgard, and one in particular, Jane Foster. Currently, Blake sits down with Foster and attempts to catch up on all that he’s missed while away. Meanwhile, Sif, Volstagg, and Beta Rey Bill lick their wounds while recovering in the blood dimension, as Thor himself remains trapped in Blake’s alternate reality.

Cates has outdone himself with this issue, and this current run he’s been on has just developed into such a compelling plot. Having read older issues of Thor I would never have foreseen the mild-mannered alter ego, Donald Blake, be twisted into this monstrous, and sociopathic version of his former self.

During the dinner scene, Cates is able to channel a version of Blake that mirrors Patrick Bateman from American Pyscho. Calm, collected, and seconds away from losing control and murdering everyone. Every word of dialogue hangs like a loosely veiled threat.

Cates loves to pull from a character’s bag of history, and long time fans of Thor will love the ending of this issue, and be vying to get their hands on the next issue.

Klein’s art is absolutely stunning. Every page had me drinking in the details of each panel as I labored over the images amazed at the particulars within the visuals. Particularly worth noting is the dinner scene in which the collaboration between Wilson and Klein are thrown together to create something wonderful and horrifying.

The visuals in this scene depict so much tension, as you’re able to visibly see the veiled tension that lays in the facial expression of Blake. The colors presented are soft and warm, but with subtle influences of colors rage in red, and terror in yellow. Wilson’s contribution only serves to define this issue as a stupendous piece of work.

Honestly, every page is littered with a blissful amount of art to keep any reader engaged and entertained.

Sabino’s work was well balanced and placed decently within the panels so as to maintain the pace of the issue. The onomatopoeia when used was eye-catching and enjoyable.

Overall, I’m in awe at how captivating this series has gotten! If you’re not reading this current Thor run, then you’re truly missing out on something magnificent. The tension that marinates throughout the issue is palpable, and I can’t get enough of it. Roll on issue #12.

Thor issue #11 is available wherever comics are sold.


Thor Issue #11
5

TL;DR

Overall, I’m in awe at how captivating this series has gotten! If you’re not reading this current Thor run, then you’re truly missing out on something magnificent. The tension that marinates throughout the issue is palpable, and I can’t get enough of it. Roll on issue #12.