REVIEW: ‘Future State: Wonder Woman,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Future State: Wonder Woman

Future State: Wonder Woman #1 is published by DC Comics, written by Jöelle Jones, with art by Jöelle Jones, colors by Jordie Bellaire, and letters by Clayton Cowles. Spinning out of the climactic finale of Dark Nights: Death Metal, this series introduces readers to a strikingly different earth. And most specifically, a strikingly different Wonder Woman.

With her central role in the previously mentioned Dark Nights: Death Metal series and Wonder Woman 1984, Diana has rarely been more central a character in DC’s universe. For that reason alone, it seems incredibly daring to introduce a new bearer of the title Wonder Woman, even if only potentially for a limited run. Nonetheless, DC has done just that. And while it’s too early to say how well she will end up carrying the mantle, one thing is for certain, this is definitely not the Wonder Woman you are used to.

Future State: Wonder Woman #1 introduces readers to Yara Flor. The initial impression readers are given of Yara is that in many ways, she is the antithesis of Diana. She seems brash, overly quick to violence, and cocky to the point of recklessness. With the way, this issue approaches the charater I have a hard time saying whether or not I like Yara yet. As much of the book is bereft of her voice.

For virtually the first half of the book writer Jones keeps Yara’s voice to a minimum, relying rather on a mysterious narrator to fill the reader in on the background, such as we get, of Yara and her world. Once the opening sequence wraps though, we do start to get a better look at Yara and her world.

Future State: Wonder Woman #1 spends the rest of its time following Yara as she heads out, with a begrudging companion, on a quest. Through this quest we see more of Yara’s personality come to light, as well as what this world’s take on the mythological will look like.

Just as Wonder Woman herself has been in the spotlight this year, so too has Greek mythology in general. Stellar video games Hades and Immortals: Fenyx Rising have both given fans of the setting fun and unique looks at these classic characters and places.  Just as I was intrigued when I first set foot in their versions of the Greek myths, I’m happy to say Jones’ artistic take on this world looks just as intriguing as those that have preceded it in 2020.

While I would rather let readers discover Jones’ take on the mythological for themselves, I will say that it is unique in its approach. It strives to blend the classic motifs of the myths with a design that leans into the modern. The result is something truly special.

The uniqueness of Future State: Wonder Woman #1’s world is further brought to life through Bellaire’s amazing colorwork. Nothing makes me happier when it comes to colorwork than when I see panels and pages awash in colors that my mind feels like shouldn’t work together, and yet, they so do. Bellaire’s ingenious color combinations give the world here such a striking, and vibrant energy.

Rounding out the visual presentation is Cowles excellent letter work. The letters are kept clear, and out of the art’s way, while still being well designed, with some alternate colors and fonts used for a bit of extra flair.

When all is said and done, Future State: Wonder Woman #1 delivers an interesting and unique take on the mythological world. Even though its star character comes across a bit one-note, there definitely feels like there is room for her to grow.

Future State: Wonder Woman #1 is available January 5th wherever comics are sold.


Future State: Wonder Woman #1
4

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Future State: Wonder Woman #1 delivers an interesting and unique take on the mythological world. Even though its star character comes across a bit one-note, there definitely feels like there is room for her to grow.