REVIEW: ‘Future State: The Flash,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Future State The Flash #1 - But Why Tho?

Future State: The Flash #1 is published by DC Comics. Written by Brandon Vietti with art by Dale Eaglesham. Mike Atiyeh is on colours and Steve Wands is the letterer.  The Flash’s speed is gone, as is every other speedster. Stolen by Wally West who has been turned evil. He has taken the Speed Force from everyone who possesses it and killed a member of his own family.

Barry Allen and other heroes that formerly used the Speed Force attack the base of the Calculator. Looking for the Thinker’s cap, they believe it to be the key to saving Wally from the darkness. But things go wrong and one of them is killed. Weeks later, Barry is still working on the project, while the others have begun to lose hope. Flash takes his new invention to his teammates, asking for one last chance. Still having faith that Wally can be redeemed, The Flash’s plan connects them all. But it will endanger them all as well.

Despite them losing their speed, the plot moves quickly. Events turn sour at a second’s notice, and they occur from the very start. There are several moments within this comic that will leave the reader stunned. Vietti doesn’t provide much room to acknowledge the severity of what just happened either, moving on rapidly. 

There’s a lot of backstory within Future State: The Flash #1, which weighs the comic down at times. Wally’s transformation happened before this issue, making it a bizarre jumping on point. The plot moving so quickly mixed with this may make it hard for new readers to latch on to the story. The tone of this issue is very bleak and dark, with little to lighten the mood. Many of the events that happen are glum and brutal. These aren’t inherently negative things, but when so many happen in just the first issue it can sometimes be too much. What happens is entirely unpredictable, which may keep the reader interested. Barry is written well by Vietti, determined to try and save his former friend and sidekick. The others have been flattened by their loss, close to giving up. But Flash never gives up on someone who needs him, even after everything Wally has done. But he and the other speedsters are struggling without their abilities. 

Without their powers, Barry and the other heroes were resorting to using the weapons they had confiscated from their rogues’ gallery. This was a fun feature to read as we saw the heroes having to adapt. But they are not experienced enough at using them, which causes problems. 

Eaglesham is great on art for most of the issue. He adapts to the physique and build of each character, making the majority of them recognizable and unique. The opening battle is extremely fun in its design. Each of the heroes has a different weapon, allowing the artist to express their different capabilities. From Captain Cold’s gun to Rainbow Rider’s Prism Goggles, both Eaglesham and Atiyeh seem to have fun with all the possibilities they have on offer. One small negative is that both Jay and Max, two older speedsters, look far too similar when out of costume.

The colours are beautiful. Atiyeh uses bold, vibrant colours throughout the issue. This contrasts with the dark tone of Future State: The Flash #1. With so much in the panel at times, the stark colours are important to keep what happens clear and coherent.

Future State: The Flash #1 is disappointing. While tackling very interesting ideas, the events happen so fast that the reader is left disjointed. Some huge events occur but aren’t quite given justice within the page. Barry himself is well-written, but some of those around him behave strangely. Each member of the Flash Family has a unique personality, and that isn’t present here. The issue is so bleak it’s hard to get through. The art is good, but it’s not got the power to carry the issue by itself. A poor start to the new series, it’s hard to see where the series will be taken next.

Future State: The Flash #1 is available where comics are sold.

Future State: The Flash #1
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TL;DR

Future State: The Flash #1 is disappointing. While tackling very interesting ideas, the events happen so fast that the reader is left disjointed. Some huge events occur but aren’t quite given justice within the page. Barry himself is well-written, but some of those around him behave strangely. Each member of the Flash Family has a unique personality, and that isn’t present here. The issue is so bleak it’s hard to get through. The art is good, but it’s not got the power to carry the issue by itself. A poor start to the new series, it’s hard to see where the series will be taken next.