REVIEW: ‘Wolverine,’ Issue #8

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Wolverine #8

Wolverine #8 is written by Benjamin Percy, illustrated by Adam Kubert and Viktor Bogdanovic, colored by Antonio Fabela and Matthew Wilson, and lettered by VC’s Cory Petit. It is published by Marvel Comics. In the wake of X of Swords, Wolverine learns that his former Team X partner Maverick has been conducting raids for an organization called Legacy House. In a prologue titled “War Stories,” Wolverine and CIA Agent Jeff Bannister reminisce about their past battles.

This issue also serves as the 350th issue of Wolverine and a jumping-on point for new readers. As a jumping-on point, it succeeds: hardcore X-Men fans will enjoy the nods to Logan’s long and violent history, and it introduces Maverick and the concept of Team X to newcomers. It does feel a little light as an anniversary issue compared to an issue like Amazing Spider-Man #850. The latter was able to tell a wide variety of stories celebrating Spider-Man’s history, and I would have liked to see more of that from this issue.

Despite that, Percy still has a great handle on Wolverine and what makes him tick. Many fans, and a few writers, often see Wolverine as nothing more than a violent and perpetually angry antihero. Yet there’s genuine pain to the character; his lost memories haunt him, and even though he and the other X-Men have found paradise on Krakoa, he can’t completely let go of his hunter’s instinct. “I’m trying,” he tells Bannister when asked about this. “But even when I focus on the future, it’s hard not to think about the blood that’s coming.” With a single sentence, Percy nails Wolverine’s character.

Both Kubert and Bogdanovic have been with this latest Wolverine series since its inception, and they both illustrate different aspects of the issue. Kubert handles the bulk of the issue, with his sharp angular artwork lending an air of menace to Logan’s movements. Kubert also puts his own spin on other mutants; Omega Red is a towering mass of muscle, and the Beast manages to keep his muscular build as well as his erudite speech. Bogdanovic’s artwork bears a strong resemblance to that of Dark Nights: Death Metal penciler Greg Capullo; however, that’s a good thing as both artists specialize in bold lines and detailed figures. Bogdanovic perfectly draws Logan’s signature “horned” hairstyle, as well as his brown-and-orange costume.

Rounding out the artistic team are the colorists who bring their own flair to their respective stories. Fabela shrouds Bogdanovic’s artwork in shadows, adding to the melancholy tone of the story. Wilson alternates between blue and purple for the scenes at night and an autumn-hued palette for the scenes set on Krakoa. It doesn’t hurt that those colors match Wolverine’s costume and provide the perfect contrast to Omega Red’s crimson ensemble.

Wolverine #8 is the perfect jumping-on point for readers old and new, reaching back into the clawed hero’s past to set up a new story. If you’re looking to get into the new era of X-Men comics, I highly suggest starting with this issue.

Wolverine #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 


Wolverine #8
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TL;DR

Wolverine #8 is the perfect jumping-on point for readers old and new, reaching back into the clawed hero’s past to set up a new story. If you’re looking to get into the new era of X-Men comics, I highly suggest starting with this issue.