REVIEW: ‘Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Cutting Edge Sirens Song #2

Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2 is published by Titan Comics, written by Francesco Dimitri, art by Mario Alberti, translated by Marc Bourbon-Crook, and letters by Jessica Burton. With Jirakee dead and the Camorra on their tails, the group has their hands full at the moment. Trying to stay alive while finding a way to help their lovesick companion find his muse is hard enough, but one of the team is beginning to suspect even more may be going on than they realize.

With Jirakee dying at the hands of the Camorra at the end of issue one, it brought many concerns for me that a book that was already lacking personality would become dryer without the human element the character brought to the team of super-geniuses. Unfortunately, Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2 only confirms these concerns. While the story moves along fluidly, there is a spark missing that keeps me from fully committing to these characters.

The first order of business for the group is figuring out exactly who is after them. They know they are part of the Camorra, and they have an alias, Il Monaco, but that it. Luckily, for a group of highly skilled individuals such as themselves, chasing down some leads takes little effort. Soon, they are hot on the trail of their target. But like any query, finding it is one thing; dealing with it is oftentimes something completely different.

Meanwhile, the team is also having to contend with a 15-year long artist’s block. They have to help their musician friend write the perfect song. But how? Art doesn’t have rules that can be manipulated, nor can it be bribed into doing what you want. It is a far more insubstantial quandary than the others the team has faced.

Throughout Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2, the only constants are the group’s self-confidence in their own intellectual superiority and how it always proves to be warranted. Whether the group really wields the level of control they project over any given situation or are overly confident is hard to tell. But their constant assurance in their skills keeps any of the moments of danger from ever really coming across as threatening. This is odd, given that last issue writer Dimitri killed off the best character in the book. But despite that, no real feeling of danger ever comes through in this story.

The art tries it’s hardest to bring emotion to the story that the characters lack. And while most of it lands solidly in the good category, there are a couple of exquisitely designed pages that truly stand out among the book. One particular full-page image completely holds the reader’s attention. With unique color choices that contrast strongly from the rest of the issue while also grabbing the eye, it combines with a smooth layout that flows beautifully, making this page is easily the high light of the entire book.

Rounding out the presentation, we have Burton’s work on letters. The letters, both font and boxes, are designed to feel perfectly cohesive with the art style implemented here while providing a clear and easily read story.

When all is said and done, Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2 delivers a fine, if emotionally shallow story. It brings this leg of the adventure to a close while laying the groundwork for the stories to come.

Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2 is available now,  wherever comics are sold.

 


Cutting Edge: The Siren's Song #2
3.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Cutting Edge: The Siren’s Song #2 delivers a fine, if emotionally shallow story. It brings this leg of the adventure to a close while laying the groundwork for the stories to come.