REVIEW: ‘Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The Dead End Kids The Suburban Job #1

Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1, published by Source Point Press, is written by Frank Gogol, illustrated and colored by Nenad Cviticanin, and lettered by Sean Rinehart. This issue is the first installment in the sequel series to Dead End Kids, written by Gogol. This series follows a new set of teens as they deal with the September 11 attacks’ fallout. With the story taking place seven years after the attacks, these former friends struggle with their own issues that came from this horrific event. Gino deals with the loss of someone important to him who died in the war. Des continues to re-play a voicemail from someone who she cares for but doesn’t seem to be around anymore. Amna visits her younger brother in the hospital, who appears to have suffered an attack because of his Middle Eastern background. However, one unfortunate discovery brings them back together to deal with a local drug dealer.

There have been numerous media pieces that have had the September 11 attacks focus on their stories. It was an event that changed the U.S. and its people in many ways. Seeing this major event be included in Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1, rather than feeling unoriginal, feels appropriate for the time while also putting a new perspective on how it affected the younger generations after time passed. As someone too young to fully comprehend the impact that the attacks had on this country, this new series gives a better perspective on the situation. At the same time, it is a work of fiction, the fact that the series is using such an event to focus on grounds it more into reality. As someone who wasn’t truly impacted by the attacks, and even if this is a work of fiction, seeing more of the perspective from three deeply affected teens will be an interesting read.

From the first few pages of Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1, it’s evident that this will be a vastly different story than the Gogol’s first series. Not only is the premise focused on the September 11 attacks, but the overall tone is much darker since it focuses on a real aspect of history. The first issue emphasizes how “one moment can change everything” and that “this is a different book entirely.” The anger and sense of loss set up by the era in which the comic takes place are very palpable. Gino and Des’s introduction and written throughout the first issue shows the anger and sense of loss resulting from the attacks. With Amna, both of these elements give her character’s introduction the most attention. It’ll be interesting to see where her character is taken and how her friendship with Gino and Des will be impacted.

The art in Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1 is exceptional. With this series have a much darker tone than its predecessor, Cviticanin’s art style perfectly matched that dark tone. The designs of the three main characters complimented how they were written. The use of darker colors in both Gino’s and Des’s attire embodied their emotions. Their clothes also fit the style of the mid-2000s, especially with Des. Seeing her in a music band t-shirt from A Day to Remember brought a heavy sense of nostalgia, which I definitely was not expecting. Rinehart’s lettering appears to be done by hand and is very detailed. It’s easy to follow and never takes away from the images. The use of bold letters in certain panels emphasizes what is said, especially in the narration.

Unfortunately, there were a few times where it was hard to follow what was going on. While the focus on the September 11 attacks was easy to follow, it wasn’t obvious what the story was about. It wasn’t until the very end that the story started to make sense. A second read of the comic was needed to fully understand what was going on with all three characters and where the story would go. While I didn’t mind re-reading the first issue, the full plot shouldn’t come together by the end of the issue. It could discourage readers who aren’t willing to wait until the end to understand the plot fully.

Overall, I really enjoyed reading Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1. Choosing to place the September 11 attacks at the center of the premise was a great choice since it will give younger readers a better sense of how much impact the event had on older generations. With this new series having three new teens at the center of the story, the story’s possibilities are immense. The art style and lettering compliment the darker tone of the series while also making it stand out from its predecessor. However, there were times where it was confusing to follow what the story would be about, though it was made much clearer at the end. I am very excited to see where Gogol takes this series, especially after reading his other work.

Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1 will be available wherever comics are sold on January 27, 2021.

 


The Dead End Kids-The Suburban Job #1
4.5

TL;DR

Overall, I really enjoyed reading Dead End Kids – The Suburban Job #1. Choosing to place the September 11 attacks at the center of the premise was a great choice since it will give younger readers a better sense of how much impact the event had on older generations. With this new series having three new teens at the center of the story, the story’s possibilities are immense.