REVIEW: ‘Transformers,’ Issue #25

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Transformers #25

After the interlude offered by the last issue focused on the winged moon, we’re back to Cybertron in this issue. Transformers #25 is published by IDW Publishing, written by Brian Ruckley, with art by Anna Malkova, colors by Joana Lafuente, and letters and colors by Jake M. Wood.

After Megatron crashed a Senate meeting in issue #23, he practically announces war against the Autobots as he imprisons both the Senators and their guards. However, the Autobots aren’t going to take Megatron’s take-over lying on their backs. Ironhide, Chromia, and Hound launch an operation to free the prisoners, specifically Sentinel Prime.

First and foremost, this is a long issue, possibly about twice the size as the other issues in this series. Despite the length, the pacing doesn’t slow down one bit, and the plot never stutters. It’s action-packed and has a large cast of characters that will be familiar to many fans, and Ruckley does a wonderful job personifying this cast.

The difference doesn’t stop at the length, however. This is definitely a more serious issue. The stakes are much higher, and the amount of violence and even deaths we’ve seen so far in this series amount to nothing in comparison. Tonally, this change is just right and really captures how serious things have gotten.

Gold nuggets of dialogue inundate the host of action panels. A Transformers comic is nothing without wit and snark. And Transformers #25 offers plenty of it to even out the more serious notes in this issue. Although most of the dialogue is wonderful, there were a few lines from Sentinel Prime that felt uncharacteristic. He’s quite eloquent when he’s imprisoned by Megatron and not as hot-headed as we have usually seen him in past issues. He does revert to his usual self later on in the issue, but these few lines nevertheless struck me as odd. But two panels out of the entire issue is a good run.

Personally, my favorite portion of Transformers #25 comes near the end. I won’t spoil much, but we get more information about the Matrix and the primes and what goes into the creation of the Autobots’ leader. With this reboot, I was unsure how the Autobots’ belief system’s religious undertones would be handled. Past Transformers series have handled the Matrix in various ways, so it’s exciting to see what’s considered canon in this reboot.

With all the action and violence, emotions are understandably running high. Malkova’s art excellently reflects the emotions that are rampant across these panels. The characters never cease to be emotive, and Lafuente’s colors bring out the best in each panel. The action is not only fun but easy to follow from panel to panel. Wood’s letters are easy to read, and the speech bubbles never overshadow the action or characters.

This long issue was an absolute treat. The tone has shifted exponentially to one more violent than past issues, but it fits with the events at play. The action and dialogue are fun, while the art and colors are wonderfully suited to this issue’s tone.

Transformers #25 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Transformers #25
4.5

TL;DR

This long issue was an absolute treat. The tone has shifted exponentially to one more violent than past issues, but it fits with the events at play. The action and dialogue are fun, while the art and colors are wonderfully suited to this issue’s tone.