REVIEW: ‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #24

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Captain Marvel #24

Captain Marvel #24 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Kelly Thompson, art by Lee Garbett and Belén Ortega, colors by Antonio Fabela, and letters by Clayton Cowles.  Having arrived at New Atlantis, Carol Danvers and company are greeted by the leader of this apparent paradise Ove. While Ove graciously welcomes them into his city, things do not feel in line with the way they are presented to the visitorS. Something, it seems, is up.

If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. That’s the old adage. And you know what, it’s usually right. When people appear in life promising happiness, splendor, and whatever else your heart desires it usually is either a straight-up lie or has some real monster strings attached. And why would New Atlantis be any different?

Captain Marvel #24 delivers this classic story setup quite well. With all the promises made by Ove of a paradise amidst the ruins of humanity, and so many willingly volunteering their powers, and lives, to make it such, Captain Marvel and friends are instantly on their guard. And I was so happy to see it.

All too often with these kinds of stories the writer would see it necessary to have most of a party like this be unreasonably naive. They would have them so overcome with the prospect of escaping the harshness of their everyday existence that no one, except Carol perhaps, would suspect anything. Happily, Thompson is far too good a writer to pen such a tale.

Instead, our intrepid heroes remain on guard as they play the good house guests while trying to discern what is really happening. This includes an awkward private dinner for Carol, which she shares with their host. While she learns a lot about what is going on, it still seems clear that Ove is hiding things from the group. And so, under cover of night, the investigation becomes more active.

While Captain Marvel #24 is overflowing with the character-rich writing Thompson is known for, this issue is stolen by Emma Frost, and her larger than life personality. She is the constant perfect blend of condescension, sarcasm, and strength. It’s Emma’s world, she just tolerates us living in it.

The art also does an admirable job of reinforcing the story’s character. With Garbett delivering the story’s present elements, and Ortega providing the flashbacks, both sides of the tale beautifully deliver. While the two artists’ works stand out from each other’s they provide a similar enough style to be different, but not jarring.

The colorwork furthers the excellent visual design of the book. Fabela’s color choices give the art an extra bit of sharpness and vibrancy.

Lastly, we round out the visuals with another solid performance by Cowls. Even with a more dialogue-heavy story like this issue, Cowles keeps everything clear and flowing smoothly.

When all is said and done, this issue furthers its narrative is a well handled, and thoroughly enjoyable way. With the situation heating up at the end of Captain Marvel #24  I look forward to seeing what reveals await Carol and company when the next issue drops.

Captain Marvel #24 is available on December 9th wherever comics are sold.

‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #24
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, this issue furthers its narrative is a well handled, and thoroughly enjoyable way. With the situation heating up at the end of Captain Marvel #24  I look forward to seeing what reveals await Carol and company when the next issue drops.