REVIEW: ‘Wonder Woman,’ Issue #768

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Wonder Woman #768

Wonder Woman #768 is published by DC Comics, written by Mariko Tamaki, art by Rafa Sandoval, inks by Jordi Tarragona, colors by Arif Prianto, and letters by Pat Brosseau. With Emma Lord’s attack on her father last issue, Wonder Woman now finds herself in the young woman’s sights. Before she must confront her though, Diana does some investigating to see why Emma is the way she is. And if there is any way she can help free her from whatever horrors Maxwell Lord put her through.

If asked what defines a hero, people will often respond with, “The hero is the one who stops the villain”. And this isn’t inaccurate. The thwarting of misdeeds certainly is a hallmark of a hero. But how much more heroic is it when the hero strives to not only stop the evil from occurring but to save the villain from themselves? When they see who the villain is and, realizing so much of what has made them what they are is completely outside their control, decide to do what they can to save everyone’s day. Even the villain’s.

Wonder Woman #768 opens with Diana being caught up to date on Maxwell Lord’s current condition, as well as the facts surrounding how he found himself clinging to life. With a bit of light detective work Diana, aided by Etta Candy, quickly confirms that Lord’s daughter Emma, has escaped from the sanatorium she was being treated at. This revelation leads to the discovery of a lifetime of abuses being perpetrated upon the girl, for reasons that are not yet clear.

The two women’s investigation is rudely interrupted however by the appearance of Deathstroke. Diana is forced into a confrontation with the assassin to keep him from harming Etta.

While Deathstroke’s top tier combat training is put on display here, I was happy to see the story not allow him to push Diana too hard. While he is considered to be one of the greatest assassins in the world, up there with the likes of Lady Shiva, he is still only a man. Faced with a demigod, trained by ageless warriors of legend, and being the veteran of a thousand battles, Diana should be able to handle this.

Once the brush with Deathstroke is concluded Diana learns that Emma has been poking around in her life, referring to her as the Evil Queen. Given that she also left “The King of Lies” written in blood on the walls of Maxwell Lord’s cell, Diana fears the girl is trapped in some form of hallucination and vows to save her from herself.

Wonder Woman #768’s art team continues to deliver a great performance with the book’s visuals. Sandoval continues to imbue the title character with all the presence befitting a goddess. The design work done by Sandoval with Emma’s hallucinations is also well-executed. The world as Emma sees it is vivid and captivating. Though a large part of the flair that comes from the pages where we see the world as Emma does must go to the excellent colors of Prianto. While the whole book’s colors are gorgeous, Emma’s world stands out as it leans into the ultra-bright fantasy vibe.

Lastly, we have Brosseau’s letters. The story here doesn’t call for too much in the way of unique or stand out fonts. But when it needs them, Brosseau delivers. A couple of key sound effects and exclamations land with a bit of extra bang, thanks to some nice font choices by Brosseau.

All told Wonder Woman #768 does a great job setting up the fight to come. With Diana being aware of her opponent’s likely state of mind, it will be interesting to see how Diana approaches the coming confrontation.

Wonder Woman #768 is available on December 8th wherever comics are sold.


'Wonder Woman,' Issue #768l
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TL;DR

All told Wonder Woman #768 does a great job setting up the fight to come. With Diana being aware of her opponent’s likely state of mind, it will be interesting to see how Diana approaches the coming confrontation.