REVIEW: ‘The Philosophy of Spider-Man’

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the Philosophy of Spider-man

The Philosophy of Spider-Man is a book told from the point of view of Peter Parker, published by Titan Comics. Peter delivers his own unique perspective on superheroism, alongside dealing with his Rogues’ Gallery and other aspects of his life from dating to working at the Daily Bugle. The book is split into eleven chapters, each one covering an aspect of the Spidey experience.

In true Spider-Man fashion, the book is packed full of witty asides and observations as well as quotes from the comics. One such example comes from the third chapter, “Spider (Fashion) Sense!” which also delves into the history of Spidey’s various costumes. Peter offers nuggets of wisdom including the perfect way to wash one’s superhero costume (hint: cold wash and soak for prolonged periods will get rid of stains) and boasts that his classic red-and-blue costume “will never go out of style.”

The book also features art from various eras of Spidey comics, including current Amazing Spider-Man writer Nick Spencer‘s run on the title. The art often ties into the theme of each chapter, such as “Romancing The Spider” which puts Parker’s various girlfriends, including Mary Jane Watson, in the spotlight. This art is also juxtaposed with various quotes from Spidey comics as well, helping make each chapter distinct and stick to its assigned theme.

Perhaps the best chapter I read is the fifth chapter, “Media Frenzy.” As one could probably guess, this centers around the Daily Bugle‘s short-tempered publisher J. Jonah Jameson and his anti-Spidey agenda. It’s hilarious that the book offers the tip “Your Editor’s Always Right!” as anyone who’s been following the Spidey canon knows, Jonah would blame Spidey for anything and everything whether it’s his fault or not. However, Peter does acknowledge that having Jonah on your side is a good thing.

Another great chapter is the eighth, “Ten Crazy Spider-Fights.” It lists ten of Spidey’s biggest fights with some of his biggest foes. And in true superhero fashion, it also features fights with several of Spidey’s fellow heroes including Wolverine. Then again, Wolverine tends to get into a fight with nearly everyone. Number one in the list was a genuine surprise, but I definitely agree that it was the right pick because it’s an impressive feat and showcases what Spidey can do once he stops holding back.

Probably the only chapter that feels off to me is the “Enter The Spider-Verse” chapter, which puts the spotlight on the various Spider-People other than Peter Parker. The flippant tone doesn’t really fit with the history Peter shares with these characters, such as his daughter Mayday, who took up the mantle of Spider-Girl, and Spider-Gwen. Given the history Peter had with his world’s version of Gwen Stacy, it feels weird to demote Spider-Gwen’s troubles to “teenage girl” issues. This also goes hand in hand with Miles Morales who’s grown as a character in terms of popularity and influence.

The Philosophy of Spider-Man captures the spirit and wit of Marvel’s friendly neighborhood web-slinger and is a must-read for all Spidey fans. From dealing with supervillains, dating, and the wrath of J. Jonah Jameson, there’s something for everyone.

The Philosophy of Spider-Man will be available to purchase on December 1 wherever books are sold.

The Philosophy of Spider-Man
  • 9/10
    Rating - 9/10
9/10

TL;DR

The Philosophy of Spider-Man captures the spirit and wit of Marvel’s friendly neighborhood web-slinger and is a must-read for all Spidey fans. From dealing with supervillains, dating, and the wrath of J. Jonah Jameson, there’s something for everyone.