REVIEW: ‘Far Sector,’ Issue #9

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Far Sector #9

Far Sector #9 is published by DC Comics under its Young Animal imprint, written by N.K. Jemisin, art by Jamal Campbell, and letters by Deron Bennett. With the turmoil of her recent chase through Atville still fresh in her mind, Lantern Mullein takes a moment to sit and talk with her assistant at a not quite so normal restaurant. And while it would probably be better for the Lantern if the discussion kept to the unique offerings of the eatery, as they say, a Lantern’s work is never done.

This issue begins with a brief look at the political system that runs the City Enduring. And while it is, on the face of it, a democratic institution, look a little closer and things rapidly begin to look out of sorts. The simple fact that no councilor, the rulers of the city, has ever been successfully recalled from office over the 1,000 years of its existence seems awfully strange. Things definitely seem strange…

Far Sector #9 central story opens with Mullein inquiring about the Feelsnet. She quickly learns this is a space where individuals exchange things that are not permitted by city laws. The chief item of trade is homegrown memes. Because the bulk of the population is still on the suppressing emotion exploit, such things are extremely rare, and hence also valuable. This information leads to some interesting revelations about the reasons for the creation of the much-debated Switchoff drug that overrides the emotion exploit.

The discussion surrounding Switchoff and the emotion exploit leads to further revelations for Mullein concerning the nature of the emotion exploit’s original release and how few people were actually in favor of it. The concept of a few people supporting something that is negative to most people, to the point where it’s so normal that many will defend something that they don’t even need and actually adversely affects them, hits rather close to home.

Once the conversation ends, Far Sector #9 sees Mullein head out to the middle of nowhere to follow up on a lead given to her. She plans to stake out a potential problem site, provided there is even anything there. Though the maps say there isn’t, Mullein soon finds some sort of installation that is well guarded and rather imposing. Happily, rent-a-cops and their quality issues appear to be a universal constant. And, lantern ring or no, Mullein can throw a rent-a-cop around any day of the week. But what will she find once she’s inside?

The art in Far Sector #9 continues to shine as Campbell delivers another great issue. I feel like a broken record talking about the same things every issue about how the world design, the look of characters, and fantastic colors make every panel eye-catching and beautiful. But, when the work is this great and this consistent, there just isn’t anything else to say. This level of consistent, great artwork is always a welcome treat to me, even if creatively talking about it can be a struggle.

Lastly, we have Bennett’s letters. The story flows smoothly throughout this book thanks in part to Bennett’s excellent grasp of lettering.

When all is said and done, Far Sector #9 delivers a strong story that helps flesh out the world and works to introduce the next act of its story. With all the action of the last couple of episodes, a bit of a slower pace is a welcome moment to let Mullein catch her breath.

Far Sector #9 is available December 1st wherever comics are sold.


Far Sector #9
4

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Far Sector #9 delivers a strong story that helps flesh out the world and works to introduce the next act of its story. With all the action of the last couple of episodes, a bit of a slower pace is a welcome moment to let Mullein catch her breath.