REVIEW: ‘Post Americana,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Post Americana #1

Post Americana #1 is published by Image Comics, written by Steve Skroce, art by Steve Skroce, colors by Dave Stewart, and letters by Fonografiks. Desolation has come to America. Now, having rebuilt their strength in a bunker under a mountain, the descendants of the one percent are preparing to march forth and reclaim the post-apocalyptic wasteland that America has become by any means necessary. Unless a hopelessly outnumbered group of freedom fighters can stop them that is.

As our story opens we are shown a cavernous assembly area. Within it, we see a gathered mass of people, vehicles, aircraft, and other assorted military equipment. While at the head of this assemblage, standing behind the seal of the president of the United States of America is a rather angry looking man. He’s giving one of the most fanatical “win one for the Gipper” speeches I’ve ever read. Everything from the purity of their people’s hearts and minds, to the complete demonization of individuals none of them have ever met, is in here. It’s the sort of authoritarian stuff that gives people with a conscience nightmares. Luckily, this underground bunker still seems to have a few of them left.

Post Americana #1 follows one of these resistance members as he helps his compatriots execute a plan to stall the forthcoming attack by their fellows, and then escape from the bunker to make contact with those who might be able to further end the threat the fanatics pose.

While the initial plan works and our hero manages to escape the bunker, the plane he and his friend are riding in is damaged and fails to get them to their planned rendezvous point. Once they touch down in the wasteland things just go from bad to worse.

The world of Post Americana #1 is filled with all threats one would expect from it’s setting. Overly large mutated animals, roving gangs of lawless marauders, and of course, what wasteland would be complete without a healthy dose of cannibals. Yup, it’s all here.

Just as the threats faced in this world are what you would expect, so too is the off-color humor that makes its presence known throughout the book. Anyone familiar with other post-apocalyptic settings such as Fallout or Wasteland will be well prepared for the tone present in this book.

The visual elements of Post Americana #1 deliver its story well. Skroce’s linework is clear, and the personality of the world comes through well. Perhaps my favorite aspect of the art is the look of the tech once the story moves to the wasteland. The presentation of the futuristic, yet poorly maintained equipment that is prevalent always caught my eye. I can’t even say precisely why. It just looks interesting.

The colorwork by Stewart leans into the humorous side of the story’s narrative nicely as well. The bright colors keep any feeling of bleakness such a wasteland could have solidly at bay. Instead opting to further the cheekiness of its characters over the harshness of its setting.

Lastly, we have the lettering work by Fonografiks. This part of the book is delivered competently. It delivers a clear and easy to follow the presentation. I think the lettering could’ve benefited from a bit more flair, given the over the top nature of some of the characters at play here. Nevertheless, the work that is done shows a strong understanding of the job’s core expectations.

In the end, Post Americana #1 delivers a solid start to its tale. While all the elements come together well enough, there isn’t a whole lot to set this story apart from the many other offerings in its genre. So if you are a die-hard fan of the off-color post-apocalyptic looking for a fix, this book might provide just the thing you are looking for.

Post Americana #1 is available November 25th wherever comics are sold.

 


Post Americana #1
3.5

TL;DR

In the end, Post Americana #1 delivers a solid start to its tale. While all the elements come together well enough, there isn’t a whole lot to set this story apart from the many other offerings in its genre. So if you are a die-hard fan of the off-color post-apocalyptic looking for a fix, this book might provide just the thing you are looking for.