REVIEW: ‘The Pull,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Pull Issue #1

The Pull #1 is published by TKO Presents, written by Steve Orlando, art by Ricardo López Ortiz, colors by Triona Farrell, and letters by Thomas Mauer.

Imagine a world in which there are thirteen law enforcement officials who are able to wield the power of a rare element found only deep within the earth’s core. Marbelite, as it’s known, imbues the officers with superhuman abilities and the ability to unleash a devastating power called Hard Heat. This police force is known as Horizon.

The Horizon force has ushered in a new age of peace, up until it all went wrong. It all started during a standoff with a scientist, now a cult leader, who prophesied the end of the world and blew up his estate using Hard Heat. Everyone thought he was a crackpot—a brilliant mind who’d been burning the candle at both ends. They never anticipated he’d be right, and now the Earth has seven days left to live. In The Pull #1, follow the events of Horizon peacekeeper Demm Brenton as he faces his last days alive.

Orlando has created a riveting, original story that engages the eye from start to finish. The first issue is packed with enough plot points that by the time the last page shows up you’ll be thirsting for more. Orlando’s view of an Earth on the edge of annihilation doesn’t hold back either, as the author introduces a truly imaginative way to deal with the anxiety of their impending doom.

The story breathes confidence, and that is perfectly parallel with The Pull’s main character Demm, the protagonist who believes he can solve Earth’s problems if he just holds tight to the justice of the Horizon Peacekeepers. For all of his other issues in life, the law has been unwavering, and it’s all that stands between him and the chaos that’s unfolding.

Ortiz’s art style is absolutely beguiling. The style mimics that of a manga but with color, and at times the flow of the art feels like that of an anime show. Much like Orlando’s plot points, Ortiz has also packed the pages with a mass amount of detail. When the issue opens up, the story immediately drops in a very lively action sequence, and the tone and the bar of detail are established immediately.

One element that I loved about Ortiz’s artistic style was their ability to capture the unique emotion in each of the characters’ faces. The opening sequence again perfectly encapsulates the level to which the creative team is setting the standard to what The Pull #1 is all about.

Farrell’s colors elevate the images to a stunning level. When Hard Heat is used by the Horizon peacekeepers, the light on the page feels cosmically powerful and pops from the page. Certain color choices lend the depictions a terrifying ambiance as highlighted in the cults’ encampment where six giant eyes have been graffitied on a wall (meant to represent the intergalactic demon, the Undoer), and each has been colored with a menacing red glow.

Mauer’s lettering was nicely balanced and placed well within the panels. The onomatopoeia style contributes to the tone of the story and adds to the pace of the action.

Overall, fans of futuristic dystopian lands will want to get in on this series. The creative team came at this first issue hard, and it leaves a monolithic impact. I am beyond eager to see what’s in store for the rest of this series. Orlando and Ortiz are not messing around!

The Pull #1 is available in stores now.

The Pull #1
5

TL;DR

Overall, fans of futuristic dystopian lands will want to get in on this series. The creative team came at this first issue hard, and it leaves a monolithic impact. I am beyond eager to see what’s in store for the rest of this series. Orland and Ortiz are not messing around!