REVIEW: ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy,’ Issue #8

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Guardians of the Galaxy #8

Guardians Of The Galaxy #8 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Al Ewing, with art by Marcio Takara, colors by Federico Blee, and letters by Cory Petit. In the last issue, a diplomatic conference was called and ambassadors from across the universe attended so they could have a say in the very fate of the universe. However, as usual, not everyone wants the best for the universe. Marvel Boy ends up being accused of not one, but two murders. Fortunately, or unfortunately, as he sees it, Marvel Boy’s only hope is that Rocket can get to the bottom of this mystery and unmask the real killer. But with all the possible culprits being ambassadors with unique powers, this might be harder than it looks.

With Rocket’s usual sarcastic and flippant attitude, the story is led primarily through Rocket’s dialogue as he logics his way through this twist on the classic whodunit situation. Suffice it to say, the majority of Guardians Of The Galaxy #8 is filled to the brim with dialogue. But, this is not a weak spot for the issue. With the room filled with powerful beings, including Super-Skrull himself, there are a lot of egos to contend with and the quibbling and squabbling between all these people bring their personalities to the forefront of this issue.

While Rocket was chosen to solve this mystery based on the fact that he’s the only one of his kind and has no allegiance to any of the universe’s nations, he was a great pick for the focus of this issue. Being drunk throughout, his flippant remarks are on point. The fact that, at the beginning of the issue, he offhandedly summarizes both the merge of the Kree and Skrull forces and also sums up the events of the last issue concisely, is not only a good way to get readers caught up but it’s also not entirely out of character for the talking raccoon.

Although the dialogue and subsequent characterization are ultimately the centerfolds of Guardians Of The Galaxy #8, the rest of the creative team has done a wonderful job rounding this issue out. Takara’s art is excellent, as usual. Not only are characters emotive throughout the panels, pulling readers in to share the characters’ mirth and angst, but the character designs, specifically the nonhuman characters, are aesthetically interesting.

Blee’s color palette is diverse and serves to enhance the art. The backgrounds are colored softly and often lack detail, making sure that readers’ eyes land on the characters first and foremost. Although this issue is filled to the brim with dialogue, Petit’s work ensures that the speech bubbles are easy to follow and that they do not clutter the panels. Petit also uses a wavy border for Rocket’s speech bubbles, emulating his drunken state well.

If you’re a fan of Rocket, you’ll get a kick out of this issue as he logics his way through a murder mystery. His flippant attitude is front and center but the rest of the cast of characters are wonderfully represented through the dialogue and art.

Guardians Of The Galaxy #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Guardians Of The Galaxy #8
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TL;DR

If you’re a fan of Rocket, you’ll get a kick out of this issue as he logics his way through a murder mystery. His flippant attitude is front and center but the rest of the cast of characters are wonderfully represented through the dialogue and art.