ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘The Orville: Heroes,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Orville: Heroes #1
The Orville: Heroes #1
is published by Dark Horse Comics, written by David A. Goodman, art by David Cabeza, colors by Michael Atiyeh, with lettering by Richard Starkings and Jimmy Betancourt. Five years ago, Ensign Talla visited the peaceful planet of the Okudum race. Now, as the Orville returns to the system, it finds things have changed. And not for the better.

When a story deals with politics nothing makes a situation more frustrating than when life is reduced to a numbers game. When people are allowed to be mistreated because to act would cause larger problems for others. To see life treated this way is always uncomfortable. Its coldness does an injustice to how we are generally taught we are to view life. And yet, there is an equally disconcerting necessity to the point of view.

Can one justify risking a far larger sum of life for the benefit of a smaller group? Is it right to ask them to make that sacrifice? Or even more to the point, simply command they do so. It is always a comfort to boo the politician in my fiction, from my comfy bed, safe in the knowledge I’ll never have to make such decisions. That I can simply cheer for the hero in my storybook. The one who will break the rules to save the day. Reassured by the knowledge that the hero will not fail.

The Orville: Heroes #1 sees the crew put into the middle of just such a situation. When they return to the Okudum’s planet, they quickly discover they are being mistreated by an interstellar race known as the Nazh. As they are not members of the Union, taking direct action could spark a war between them and the Union. The potential of which would cause suffering on a grander scale.

To prevent such an eventuality, the crew of the Orville is told to move along and the Union will reach out through political channels to see if they can resolve the situation peacefully. This method will take a great deal more time to see results. If any results will even come from it. Some members of the crew find this decision….. unsatisfactory.

The Orville: Heroes #1 a good job handling it’s an all too real topic. Writer Goodman gives the proper emotion to the characters lines as feelings over their forced neutrality heat up. Ensign Talla in particular is handled well. As the crew member most personally upset by the Union’s decision, she is the most profoundly hurt by their hands being tied. Artist  Cabeza continues to do an excellent job capturing the various personalities of The Orville. Just as with his previous work in with the property, everyone is portrayed in a way that makes them instantly recognizable from their live-action counterparts.

Along with Cabeza’s strong art, Atiyeh does a good job with the colorwork in The Orville: Heroes #1. I especially like the choices of color used for both the Okudum, as well as the Nazh. Where the Nazh are shown in nothing but cold shades of blue, the Okudum are awash in bright, vibrant, and warm colors. Instantly setting them apart from the colder, more uniformed look of their oppressors. Wrapping up the visual presentation is Starkings and Betancourt’s lettering. The lettering works well to deliver its plot in a clean, and easy to follow manner.

With the crew of the Orville not officially able to interfere, their options are limited. Luckily, like the stars of so many heroic tales, limited options are unlikely to keep their hands tied for long. The Orville: Heroes #1 leaves me looking forward to seeing how this story resolves itself next issue.

The Orville: Heroes #1 is available November 4th.

The Orville: Heroes #1
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TL;DR

With the crew of the Orville not officially able to interfere, their options are limited. Luckily, like the stars of so many heroic tales, limited options are unlikely to keep their hands tied for long. The Orville: Heroes #1 leaves me looking forward to seeing how this story resolves itself next issue.