REVIEW: ‘Black Widow: Widow’s Sting,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1

Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Ralph Macchio, art by Simone Buonfantino, colors by Rachelle Rosenberg and letters by Travis Lanham. A S.H.E.I.L.D agent has gone missing after attempting to infiltrate the home of notorious Maggia crime boss Silvermane. Now, Black Widow has been tasked with finding the agent and preventing Silvermane from unleashing a dreadful weapon. But is Natasha up to it?

Spy stories often have a classic rhythm to them. Especially when they center around infiltrating a rich villain’s estate. Some covert shenanigans to gain access to the grounds, spy dons some snazzy evening wear to blend in, then everything goes wild when the final grab is made for the targeted item. It’s classic. It shows off the wide range of skills the spy wields at their disposal, while giving them a chance to show off their social graces as well. Luckily for our hero, she wields all the necessary skills in spades.

As one of Marvel Comics oldest and most venerable heroes, most fans are thoroughly familiar with the Black Widow. However, if you weren’t, and wanted a nice, no strings attached story to aquatint yourself with Marvel most legendary femme fatale, Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 would serve as a great introduction to the character.

Within the pages of this story, writer Macchio takes the time to highlight every strength Natasha posses in her veritable arsenal. From her highly efficient style of quick take down combat, to her quick thinking and cool confidence, everything that makes Natasha arguably Marvel’s most capable secret agent is on display here.

Beyond serving as a great introduction to the character however, Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 doesn’t provide anything else I’d call exceptional. The story as a whole is very cookie cutter for the most part. There are no particularly dramatic moments, though it did serve a couple minor twists I didn’t see coming. Even these small surprises never managed to elevate the tale beyond just being good.

The art in Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 serves it story well. Artist Buonfantino captures both combat, as well as the swank of a crime boss’s party with equal skill. The only place where the art stumbles a bit, unfortunately, is in it’s portrayal of the story’s titular character herself.

Several times during the story I found myself being pulled out of the tale by how Natasha’s face was drawn. Repeatedly the eyes were placed so far apart it looked almost alien to me. This along with some inconsistencies with the  Black Widow’s overall figure in a several panels kept me from fully appreciating the rest of the art’s fine work.

While the line work in Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 was a little off, I had no such troubles with the colors. Rosenberg’s colors do a great job reinforcing each moment within the story. They deliver striking contrasts that highlight each panel’s focus, as well as creating the right tone for each scene.

Lastly, we have Lanham’s lettering. The letter work here delivers it’s story in a clear and easy to follow manner. It’s flows nicely, while never infringing upon the art’s presentation.

When all is said and done Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 delivers a fine, if routine story, for Marvel First Lady of espionage. While it’s a bit by the numbers, it’s no strings attached approach serves as a great introduction for newer fans who may have discovered Natasha recently and want to see her in action.

Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 is available October 28th wherever comics are sold.

 

Black Widow: Widow's Sting #1
3.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 delivers a fine, if routine story, for Marvel First Lady of espionage. While it’s a bit by the numbers, it’s no strings attached approach serves as a great introduction for newer fans who may have discovered Natasha recently and want to see her in action.