REVIEW: ‘Amazing Spider-Man,’ Issue #50.LR

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR is written by Nick Spencer and Matthew Rosenberg, illustrated by Federico Vicentini, colored by Marcio Meynz, and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna. It is published by Marvel Comics. Following the events of Amazing Spider-Man #50, Peter Parker battles his fellow Spider-powered heroes who have been infested by Kindred. Meanwhile, Norman Osborn comes to terms with the weight of his sins.

With “Last Remains,” Spencer is employing a similar tactic he used with the “Hunted” storyline in Amazing Spider-Man, expanding the story through supplemental issues. Unlike other storylines or even crossover events, Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR is confined to the main Amazing Spider-Man title which makes it easier to follow. And while the issue count may not have increased, the story remains painfully personal for Peter Parker.

Kindred knows how to hit Spidey where it hurts: through the people he cares about. Spencer and Rosenberg showcase Spidey at the end of his rope. He obviously doesn’t want to die but he’s also not going to hurt his friends. While noble in practice, this ultimately ends up backfiring and could hurt the other heroes far more than a punch or kick could.

Intercutting Spidey’s fight with his friends is Osborn’s therapy session. Norman Osborn is one of the worst villains in the Marvel Universe. As the Green Goblin, he’s inflicted multiple horrors upon Spider-Man. Yet, after his encounter with the Sin-Eater, he seeks redemption. It’s unexpected, and honestly more than a little disturbing, which I’m sure is what Spencer and Rosenberg were going for.

While Kindred doesn’t fully appear in the issue, the revelation of his identity still sends shockwaves through the books, especially where Osborn is concerned. Spencer and Rosenberg seem to be hinting at Osborn potentially playing a role in helping Spidey defeat Kindred, which will be interesting given their rivalry.

Vicentini has a chance to draw action-packed sequences with Spidey and quiet, contemplative sequences with Osborn. It’s in the fight sequences where he truly shines. Readers will feel every punch, kick, and impact. Vicentini also gets to draw extremely frightening versions of Spider-Man’s allies. Spider-Gwen’s mask is transformed into a fanged monstrosity, while Miles Morales has jagged eyes and blood-red claws. It’s the stuff of nightmares.

Vicentini also draws his characters in perpetual motion. Much like fellow Spidey artists Ryan Ottley and Patrick Gleason, he understands that this character is all about movement. This also goes for the other Spider-folk, who leap with a grace that was once acrobatic and is now horrific.

Rounding out the artistic team is Meynz on colors. He utilizes brighter colors for Spidey’s scenes, which is a disturbing contrast with the Kindred-infected Spider-people, and darker ones for Osborn’s scenes. Osborn’s flashbacks are also tinted a sickly green, fitting his former mantle of the Green Goblin.

Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR significantly raises the stakes of the “Last Remains” storyline, putting Peter Parker’s allies in danger and hinting at a partnership with his deadliest enemy. The best Spider-Man stories are usually the ones where he beats impossible odds, and right now it looks like the deck is stacked against the friendly neighborhood web-slinger.

Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR is available wherever comics are sold.

Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR
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TL;DR

Amazing Spider-Man #50.LR significantly raises the stakes of the “Last Remains” storyline, putting Peter Parker’s allies in danger and hinting at a partnership with his deadliest enemy. The best Spider-Man stories are usually the ones where he beats impossible odds, and right now it looks like the deck is stacked against the friendly neighborhood web-slinger.