REVIEW: ‘The Juggernaut,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Juggernaut #2

The Juggernaut #2 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Fabian Nicieza, with art by Ron Garney, colors by Matt Milla, and letters by Joe Sabino. Cain Marko’s pursuit of a more constructive life has landed him face to face with the Immortal Hulk. With D-Cel live streaming their fight, can Cain Marko settle once and for all whether the unstoppable force can topple an immovable object?

There is an old adage that the same person cannot cross the same river twice. For upon the second crossing, they are not the same person, nor is it the same river. We have all had that day. When we look in the mirror and realize we are no longer who we once were, that before us stands a new person. One who has grown from what they were into, hopefully, something better. But can this change ever free us from what we did? Can we ever say the actions of our former selves are not our own? Or are we forever bound to the guilt our past selves have forged for us, no matter what our present selves may be?

The Juggernaut #2 sees Marko attempt to put past sins to rest. To this end, he has confronted the Hulk so that the Jade Giant might face those he has wronged. And perhaps, to exorcise a few of his own wrongs in the process.

The bulk of this issue focuses on the two powerhouses as they clash in a secluded area of the wilderness. This portion of the comic delivers the high-level slugfest a reader would expect of these two characters. Though Marko clearly is not at his peak, he can still give a good show of himself. And, he brought back up.

This main sequence is interrupted to show us a flashback of Marko shortly after he emerged from limbo. While recovering in a hospital he is visited by the astral projection of his stepbrother Charles Xavier. His brother is checking in to make sure he is ok. But when Marko brings up the topic of journeying to Krakoa to rejoin the X-Men once his convalescence is over, Xavier informs him that Krakoa is only for mutants. Therefore, there is no place for Marko.

Despite Xavier’s assurances that he believes in his stepbrother, Marko looks visibly hurt. Throughout the years Xavier was the one person that had always opened his home to him and who was willing to forgive and take him in. Now, whatever good reasons he may have, it comes across as simple abandonment on Xavier’s part. Marko is truly homeless.

Once the battle has ended, the Hulk is taken to a town hall to face those who have been wronged by him. While this seems like a therapeutic move for those individuals, things do not quite go as planned.

The art for The Juggernaut #2 does a good job of delivering its stories’ many beats. Whether it’s the full-on slugfest, of the more verbal confrontation at the town hall, Garney provides images that do a good job delivering on each moment.

The art is further built up by Milla’s excellent use of colors, particularly in how the colors are contrasted against each other. Harsh bright lights serve to highlight individuals in some key panels. This heightens the feeling within these particular moments wonderfully.

Finally, we have Sabine’s letter work, which does a commendable job delivering the story. While everything is laid out well, I did feel there are a few moments that could have been helped with a little more flash to the text—a couple of spots where some larger fonts or bolder lettering might have added a little extra touch.

When all is said and done, The Juggernaut #2 delivers a strong payoff to this series’ first small arc. It delivers some quality action moments while continuing to explore a deeper side of Marko’s character.

The Juggernaut #2 is available on October 21st wherever comics are sold.

The Juggernaut #2
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, The Juggernaut #2 delivers a strong payoff to this series’ first small arc. It delivers some quality action moments while continuing to explore a deeper side of Marko’s character.